Book Review: Ink and Bone by Rachel Caine

Book Review: Ink and Bone by Rachel CaineInk and Bone by Rachel Caine
Series: The Great Library #1
Published by NAL on July 7, 2015
Genres: Fantasy, Young Adult
Pages: 368
Format: ARC
Source: Publisher
Goodreads
5 Stars
In an exhilarating new series, New York Times bestselling author Rachel Caine rewrites history, creating a dangerous world where the Great Library of Alexandria has survived the test of time.…

Ruthless and supremely powerful, the Great Library is now a presence in every major city, governing the flow of knowledge to the masses. Alchemy allows the Library to deliver the content of the greatest works of history instantly—but the personal ownership of books is expressly forbidden.

Jess Brightwell believes in the value of the Library, but the majority of his knowledge comes from illegal books obtained by his family, who are involved in the thriving black market. Jess has been sent to be his family’s spy, but his loyalties are tested in the final months of his training to enter the Library’s service.

When he inadvertently commits heresy by creating a device that could change the world, Jess discovers that those who control the Great Library believe that knowledge is more valuable than any human life—and soon both heretics and books will burn.…

Book Review:

INK AND BONE is one of those books I always wanted, but I never knew it until I read it. There are so many good ideas and it’s such a great story that I’m still thinking about INK AND BONE a month after finishing it. With the amount of books I read, about 20 per month, it’s rare that a book sticks with me.

Jess lives in a world where owning personal copies of books is illegal. The Great Library has survived since the days of Alexandria and now exists in every city. The Library controls access to book and knowledge, functioning with as much power as a country. Jess’s family makes a living selling books on the black market, and seeing an opportunity, his father sends him to the Library, with the intent of having a spy on the inside.

But joining the Library isn’t that easy. There are 32 postulants and 6 available spots. The competition is fierce and dangerous. Jess must navigate a murky world, one where disagreeing with the Library’s policies and politics can be deadly. For example, when Jess is in the middle of a war zone, he could call on his family connections to survive, but doing so would expose his book smuggling background. What to do?

Imagine the greatest texts of the world surviving through the centuries thanks to the Library. But at the same time, imagine the same Library controlling which of those texts the public can see. Imagine a world where you can’t own your own books. It’s every book lover’s nightmare, right?

Rachel Caine explores those ideas and others in INK AND BONE. It’s a very thinky book, but enjoyably so. Jess’s time as a postulant for the Library is the best sort of dangerous adventure, one that’s fun to read but left me thinking. I cannot wait to return to the world the author’s created — bring on the next book!

Let’s talk about it:

What would you do if you lived in a world where you couldn’t own books?

Socialize with the author:

Rachel Caine:
Website
Facebook
Twitter

– leeanna

Armchair BEA 2015: Day 1: Introduction

armchair bea 2014

Design by Amber of Shelf Notes

I can’t believe this is my fourth year doing Armchair BEA! You’d have thought I’d found my way to BEA by now, haha. But no — I love the virtual version and I always enjoy participating. This year I’m hoping to meet some new blogging friends, maybe even some writing friends, and check out a lot of new blogs.


1: Tell us a bit about yourself: How long have you been blogging? Where are you from? How did you get into blogging?

leeannaMy name is Leeanna, which is a bit obvious from the blog name. When I first started trying to think of a blog name, I happened to see if www.leeanna.me was available and it was … so it seemed like a good idea!

I’ve been blogging here since February 2012. I’m from ultra-exciting Ohio, which means I have a lot of time for blogging, lol. I got into blogging because I like reviewing/talking about books and wanted somewhere on the web for myself. Nothing too exciting!


2: What does diversity mean to you?

I tend to think of diversity in terms of sexual orientation/gender identity, because a lot of of my interest is finding amazing LGBT/QUILTBAG/whatever acronym you want to use books.

I want to see ALL THE THINGS in books, because I think that’s how a lot of kids/teens/adults learn about who they are and how others feel.


3: Why do you loving reading and blogging?

Somehow the stork delivered me to a family of non-readers! I also don’t have anyone in real life to talk to about the books I read, and we all know how sometimes you just need to gush or cry or angst about a book, right? I’m not always the best at being social even so, but events like these are great to find new book blogging buddies!

Blogging also gives me the opportunity to try different things, like keep up with new blogging tech, social media, expand my blog, etc. Well, that’s the theory. I tend to get so caught up in reading and reviewing that I never do bloggy things I want to do, like more personal posts. I do hope to kick off a personal year long project of posting 1 book photo per day to my Instagram account, as an extra way of promoting books I love while improving my book photography skills (you’ll see below they aren’t too good yet!)

As for why I love reading… it’s just a part of me. I can’t even begin to answer that question, other than say I can’t go a few hours without reading.


4: Take a picture of your bookshelf and share it with us!

armchair bea 2015 shelfie

My main series of bookshelves. It’s hard to get them all in one picture because they span an entire wall. There’s a Star Wars/Forgotten Realms bookcase, a fantasy/urban fantasy/paranormal/science fiction bookcase, and a general bookcase. As you can see, they’re starting to get a bit messy, which means I need to reorganize.

armchair bea 2015 shelfie

My attempt at a rainbow bookcase! Yellow/orange/green book spines are hard to find! The bottom shelf used to be my Harry Potter collection (US and UK editions) but it’s been taken over by books I need to find spots.


And that’s it. I went with 4 questions since I’m worried my electric will go out before I finish this post :D See ya’ll tomorrow!

– leeanna

Book Review: The Shadow Revolution by Clay Griffith and Susan Griffith

Book Review: The Shadow Revolution by Clay Griffith and Susan GriffithThe Shadow Revolution by Clay Griffith, Susan Griffith
Published by Del Rey on June 2, 2015
Genres: Paranormal, Steampunk, Urban Fantasy
Pages: 320
Format: eARC
Source: NetGalley
Goodreads
3 Stars
A thrilling new Victorian-era urban fantasy for fans of Kevin Hearne’s Iron Druid Chronicles, the Showtime series Penny Dreadful, and the Sherlock Holmes movies featuring Robert Downey, Jr.

They are the realm’s last, best defense against supernatural evil. But they’re going to need a lot more silver.

As fog descends, obscuring the gas lamps of Victorian London, werewolves prowl the shadows of back alleys. But they have infiltrated the inner circles of upper-crust society as well. Only a handful of specially gifted practitioners are equipped to battle the beasts. Among them are the roguish Simon Archer, who conceals his powers as a spell-casting scribe behind the smooth veneer of a dashing playboy; his layabout mentor, Nick Barker, who prefers a good pub to thrilling heroics; and the self-possessed alchemist Kate Anstruther, who is equally at home in a ballroom as she is on a battlefield.

After a lycanthrope targets Kate’s vulnerable younger sister, the three join forces with fierce Scottish monster-hunter Malcolm MacFarlane—but quickly discover they’re dealing with a threat far greater than anything they ever imagined.

Book Review:

A couple of years ago, I thoroughly enjoyed a wickedly good vampire book, THE GREYFRIAR, by Clay Griffith and Susan Griffith. Ever since finishing the Vampire Empire series, I’ve kept my eye out for new books by the authors since I couldn’t wait to read something else of theirs.

THE SHADOW REVOLUTION kicks off a new urban fantasy series set in Victorian London, Crown & Key. Simon Archer may be the last scribe around, but he prefers to squander his time attending parties and finding his way into corsets. He and mentor Nick happily stick to the shadows until one of his old paramours is killed in front of him … by a werewolf.

It’s the kick Simon needs to realize he’s wasting his potential. But of course, he soon finds himself in a world of trouble when he helps Kate Anstruther rescue her sister from another werewolf. Because one werewolf just isn’t enough — they manage to find a whole pack.

THE SHADOW REVOLUTION has a magic system I like; I’m always craving inscription and alchemy! I do wish we saw more of both, but what was there was good. I was particularly intrigued by Simon’s tattoos (the cover is a great representation), which allow him to quickly cast spells. Aether sickness, which comes on from using too much magic, is a fitting downside.

The characters are also fun, and I look forward to seeing more of them. Simon’s described as a playboy, and there’s a little of that, but I was also happy to a deeper, more responsible side to him. Kate’s good too, a woman who bucks society’s conventions in favor of her interest in alchemy. I would have liked to see more about Nick, Kate’s servant Hogarth, cool inventor Penny, and werewolf hunter Malcolm.

There’s a LOT of action in THE SHADOW REVOLUTION, and so I found there was less character development because so much time was spent fighting. The action scenes were good, but after a while, I have to confess I wanted to drug everyone with a potion so they’d take a break. There was a lot of charging into danger when worn out and injured from the last fight, and the fights got a bit repetitive.

However, even if I did have a few quibbles with THE SHADOW REVOLUTION, I will definitely check out the rest of the series. I’ve never seen such creepy homunculi, for instance, and I’m super curious about the key, as well as if Simon and Kate’s fathers will have any importance on the story.

This is a great time to start, because book two, THE UNDYING LEGION, will be out at the end of June, and book three, THE CONQUERING DARK will be out at the end of July. No year long wait between installments!

Socialize with the author:

Clay Griffith and Susan Griffith:
Website
Facebook
Twitter

– leeanna

Book Review: Headstrong by Rachel Swaby

Book Review: Headstrong by Rachel SwabyHeadstrong: 52 Women Who Changed Science--and the World by Rachel Swaby
Published by Broadway Books on April 7, 2015
Genres: Biography, Non Fiction
Pages: 288
Format: Paperback
Source: Blogging For Books
Goodreads
5 Stars
Fifty-two inspiring and insightful profiles of history’s brightest female scientists.

In 2013, the New York Times published an obituary for Yvonne Brill. It began: “She made a mean beef stroganoff, followed her husband from job to job, and took eight years off from work to raise three children.” It wasn’t until the second paragraph that readers discovered why the Times had devoted several hundred words to her life: Brill was a brilliant rocket scientist who invented a propulsion system to keep communications satellites in orbit, and had recently been awarded the National Medal of Technology and Innovation. Among the questions the obituary—and consequent outcry—prompted were, Who are the role models for today’s female scientists, and where can we find the stories that cast them in their true light?

Headstrong delivers a powerful, global, and engaging response. Covering Nobel Prize winners and major innovators, as well as lesser-known but hugely significant scientists who influence our every day, Rachel Swaby’s vibrant profiles span centuries of courageous thinkers and illustrate how each one’s ideas developed, from their first moment of scientific engagement through the research and discovery for which they’re best known. This fascinating tour reveals these 52 women at their best—while encouraging and inspiring a new generation of girls to put on their lab coats.

Book Review:

HEADSTRONG: 52 WOMEN WHO CHANGED SCIENCE — AND THE WORLD is a needed book. I wish it wasn’t, but it is. Even in 2015, women still struggle to make their way in male dominated fields like physics, astronomy, computer science, mathematics, etc.

I experienced discrimination based on my gender when I was a computer science student. I’ve been told I’m not a “real geek” because I’m a girl. Although I’m no Yvonne Brill — the inspiration for this book, whose accomplishments as a rocket scientist were overshadowed by her domestic abilities by the New York Times — I understood the struggle every woman mentioned in this book went through. And I’m ashamed to say I’d heard of maybe 4 out of the 52.

HEADSTRONG is separated into 7 sections: medicine, biology and the environment, genetics and development, physics, earth and stars, math and technology, and invention. To be included in the book, the author picked “only scientists whose life’s work has already been completed (xiii).” Due to that, the author admits the book is not very diverse, as opportunities opened up first for white women. She also didn’t include Marie Curie, because if you think of a woman scientist, that’s likely the one you picture. But did you know Marie Curie’s daughter, Irène Joliot-Curie, also won a Nobel Prize?

The profiles are relatively short, 3-5 pages, and focus on the woman’s contributions to her field. I read one or two sections a night and felt like I learned a ton about women in science. For example, I never knew a woman invented Kevlar, or wrinkle free cotton, or the Apgar score. The profiles are easy enough to understand for young girls, and interesting enough to hold the attention of older readers.

What will you learn?

Socialize with the author:

Rachel Swaby:
Website
Twitter

– leeanna

Book Review: Life Unaware by Cole Gibsen

Book Review: Life Unaware by Cole GibsenLife Unaware Published by Entangled Teen on April 28, 2015
Genres: Contemporary, Romance, Young Adult
Pages: 320
Format: ARC
Source: Amazon Vine
Goodreads
4 Stars
Regan Flay has been talking about you.

Regan Flay is on the cusp of achieving her control-freak mother's "plan" for high school success―cheerleading, student council, the Honor Society—until her life gets turned horribly, horribly upside down. Every bitchy text. Every bitchy email. Every lie, manipulation, and insult she's ever said have been printed out and taped to all the lockers in school.

Now Regan has gone from popular princess to total pariah.

The only person who even speaks to her is her former best friend's hot but socially miscreant brother, Nolan Letner. Nolan thinks he knows what Regan's going through, but what nobody knows is that Regan isn't really Little Miss Perfect. In fact, she's barely holding it together under her mom's pressure. But the consequences of Regan's fall from grace are only just beginning. Once the chain reaction starts, no one will remain untouched...

Especially Regan Flay.

Book Review:

In my opinion, LIFE UNAWARE is one of Entangled Teen’s best books to date.

When Regan Flay’s nasty texts, emails, and IMs are plastered all over the school, the popular girl plummets to the bottom of the social hierarchy. Regan even faces some of the bullying she’s dished out, insulted and ignored by her friends. At first, Regan tries to face the crisis like her congresswoman mother would, but does she really want to do that? Does she want to act like her mother, who has a suffocating plan for Regan’s success? Or does she want to be herself?

LIFE UNAWARE is a perfect title for this book. Until she’s on the other side, Regan isn’t aware of how her mean comments and actions impact others. And even though she has an anxiety disorder and an overbearing mother, Regan acknowledges there’s no excuse for being a bully. In her own words, “I was just… being an asshole (p. 86).” With the help of Nolan, her former best friend’s brother and fellow outcast, Regan starts to turn her mind around and realize high school is hard enough — she doesn’t need to add to the horribleness.

I do think Regan’s turnaround was a little fast — it happened in about a week. But I really like the message in LIFE UNAWARE, that instead of bullying each other, we should stand up for each other. Say nice things instead of nasty insults. The way Regan realizes this is quite surprising. I won’t spoil it, but I like that whole aspect of the book.

Socialize with the author:

Cole Gibsen:
Website
Facebook
Twitter

– leeanna

Book Review: The Wrath and the Dawn by Renee Ahdieh

Book Review: The Wrath and the Dawn by Renee AhdiehThe Wrath and the Dawn by Renee Ahdieh
Series: The Wrath and the Dawn #1
Published by Putnam Juvenile on May 12, 2015
Genres: Fairy Tales, Fantasy, Retelling, Romance, Young Adult
Pages: 396
Format: ARC
Source: Amazon Vine
Goodreads
2 Stars
A sumptuous and epically told love story inspired by A Thousand and One Nights.

Every dawn brings horror to a different family in a land ruled by a killer. Khalid, the eighteen-year-old Caliph of Khorasan, takes a new bride each night only to have her executed at sunrise. So it is a suspicious surprise when sixteen-year-old Shahrzad volunteers to marry Khalid. But she does so with a clever plan to stay alive and exact revenge on the Caliph for the murder of her best friend and countless other girls. Shazi's wit and will, indeed, get her through to the dawn that no others have seen, but with a catch . . . she’s falling in love with the very boy who killed her dearest friend.

She discovers that the murderous boy-king is not all that he seems and neither are the deaths of so many girls. Shazi is determined to uncover the reason for the murders and to break the cycle once and for all.

Book Review:

THE WRATH AND THE DAWN is a book I was really excited to read. A young adult book inspired by A Thousand and One Nights? A young adult book set in the Middle East? Check and check. I couldn’t wait to read this one.

But THE WRATH AND THE DAWN left me disappointed. There are some good things in this book, but the majority of it had me wondering why I kept turning the pages. Midway through, I checked the average rating, which is currently 4 stars on Amazon and Goodreads. Oh well, I’m in the minority on not liking THE WRATH AND THE DAWN.

What I did like:

–The setting. THE WRATH AND THE DAWN is set in historical Khorasan. The author includes lots of details on clothing styles, food, flowers, and buildings, to help the reader imagine a place that might be foreign. But at the same time, I would have liked more worldbuilding, so I had a better idea of the time period and the country itself. For example, the main character’s handmaiden is Greek… how? There’s an element of magic… how?

–Shahrzad. She’s a strong main character, a girl who volunteers to be the Caliph’s bride in the hopes of avenging her best friend’s murder. Shahrzad puts herself into danger with a somewhat flimsy plan, but also ensured the safety of her family before marrying Khalid. I liked how she was observant and not afraid to speak up for herself.

What I didn’t like:

–The writing. In some ways, THE WRATH AND THE DAWN felt incredibly overwritten to me, yet lacking in certain details or emotional connection. The author describes Shahrzad’s intricate outfits every day, but when Shahrzad and Khalid have sex the first night they’re married? The encounter is described in a sentence, and never do we find out what Shahrzad thinks of it. Surely there would be some emotional impact on having sex with someone she considers a monster? That incident isn’t a huge thing, but it’s indicative of how I felt emotionally about this book. I just didn’t connect with it.

Perhaps the author’s style just isn’t for me. There are quite a few odd turns of phrase and metaphors, and I often had to stop and think about what she was trying to say. Having to do so drew me out of the book, and by the middle of THE WRATH AND THE DAWN, I wasn’t too interested anymore.

–The relationship between Shahrzad and Khalid. For a relationship that goes from enemies to lovers, it happens really fast. It’s not insta-love, but I personally needed more development of their relationship to believe it. I don’t know what Khalid saw in Shahrzad the first night, why he spared her life when he had killed every other bride. I’m also not entirely sure why Shahrzad started to fall for Khalid, wanting to kiss him while she wanted to kill him.

We know Khalid is a monster. Shahrzad knows he’s a monster. She starts the book off wanting to kill him. But then her feelings change because other people tell her Khalid isn’t the monster she thinks he is. He had a bad childhood. She’s conflicted, determined to get revenge for her friend even as she’s falling for Khalid. I don’t get it, but then, I’m usually quite picky with romance.

–Lastly, for a book that reimagines A Thousand and One Nights, I expected more stories! I really wanted to see Shahrzad telling Khalid more Arabian folk tales. I think there are two nights of storytelling described. I assume Shahrzad kept telling stories, but why not share more with the reader?

Overall, I was disappointed with THE WRATH AND THE DAWN. It’s the first in a trilogy, and based on my feelings for this book, I’m not sure if I’ll continue the series or not.

Socialize with the author:

Renee Ahdieh:
Website
Facebook
Twitter

– leeanna

Waiting on Wednesday: Ink and Bone by Rachel Caine

waiting on wednesday

ink and bone by rachel caineInk and Bone (The Great Library #1) by Rachel Caine
Release Date: July 7, 2015

In an exhilarating new series, New York Times bestselling author Rachel Caine rewrites history, creating a dangerous world where the Great Library of Alexandria has survived the test of time…

Ruthless and supremely powerful, the Great Library is now a presence in every major city, governing the flow of knowledge to the masses. Alchemy allows the Library to deliver the content of the greatest works of history instantly—but the personal ownership of books is expressly forbidden.

Jess Brightwell believes in the value of the Library, but the majority of his knowledge comes from illegal books obtained by his family, who are involved in the thriving black market. Jess has been sent to be his family’s spy, but his loyalties are tested in the final months of his training to enter the Library’s service.

When he inadvertently commits heresy by creating a device that could change the world, Jess discovers that those who control the Great Library believe that knowledge is more valuable than any human life—and soon both heretics and books will burn.…

INK AND BONE just sounds fantastic, doesn’t it? A world where great texts have survived to to present times because of the Great Library. But then once you factor in that personal ownership of books is forbidden, and the Library approves everything… then INK AND BONE becomes creepy. Fantastic, but creepy.

So let me “cheat” a little and say I have already gotten to read this pick of mine — and I can ensure you, it is fantastic. I should have a review up in a week or so, so remember to check back if you want to find out what I thought!

Socialize with the author:
Website
Facebook
Twitter

Waiting on Wednesday is hosted by Breaking the Spine.

– leeanna

The Reading Machine [15] – May 10, 2015

reading machine

For my Stacking the Shelves/Sunday Post, which I’m calling The Reading Machine, I list the books I’ve bought recently, books I might hope to read in the upcoming week, a short life/blog update, and anything else of note.

Stacking the Shelves is hosted by Tynga’s Reviews, and you can find out all about it here. Sunday Post is hosted by Caffeinated Book Reviewer, and you can find out all about it here.

The Reading Machine:

the reading machine may 9

I was excited to get approved for SILVER IN THE BLOOD by Jessica Day George and UNDER THE LIGHTS by Dahlia Adler this week. Reading wise, I’m hoping to finish UPROOTED by Naomi Novik, THE SHADOW REVOLUTION by Clay Griffith and Susan Griffith, and HIDDEN HUNTRESS by Danielle L. Jensen. It’s supposed to rain a lot this week, so maybe I’ll be able to do a lot of catch up reading.

If you liked Danielle’s debut, STOLEN SONGBIRD, be sure to check back here at the end of May, because I’m going to have a special guest post to celebrate the release of HIDDEN HUNTRESS!

On the Blog:

I’ve had a bunch of reviews in the past 2 weeks, listed below:

Pirate’s Alley by Suzanne Johnson
An Ember in the Ashes by Sabaa Tahir
The Girl at Midnight by Melissa Gray
Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda by Becky Albertalli
A Court of Thorns and Roses by Sarah J. Maas
River Road by Suzanne Johnson

I’ve been showing my black sheepish self with not loving AN EMBER IN THE ASHES, THE GIRL AT MIDNIGHT, and A COURT OF THORNS AND ROSES as much as everyone else. But I’m okay with that. I mean, that’s why reviews are important — because not everyone is going to love every book.

In the next couple of weeks I’m hoping to add some discussion and other fun posts to the mix. I keep saying I’m going to do this, but then I get behind. I spend a lot of time outside in the summer, so I’m way too worn out at night to think, lol. As I said above, we’re supposed to have a week of thunderstorms, so maybe I’ll get some more posts ready and scheduled since I won’t be busting my butt outside every day.

What Up, Life?

the reading machine camp nano winner

Yeah, that’s about all I need to say for this :D I’m so happy that I finally won a NaNoWriMo. My Camp April goal wasn’t too high — only 10k — but I learned one important thing. I’m really good at talking myself out of doing things I want to do. I plan on doing the next session of Camp NaNo too — anyone participating, or won April?

the reading machine star wars day

May 4th was Star Wars day. May the Fourth be with you! The Star Wars section of my library is part of the inspiration I had for my one book photo a day project I mentioned in my last Reading Machine post. There are some great stories there, and some great authors who got their start or got better known writing Star Wars books. Some of my favorite characters are also in those books, such as Tenel Ka and Mara Jade. I don’t want to see them forgotten with the new “Canon” Star Wars, so… yeah. That project will probably be a go in June.

the reading machine arrows

Lastly, I finally had some fun this week. I bought a recurve bow last year, but I’m usually way too busy to enjoy it much, even though I can target shoot in my backyard. It’s a lot of fun… especially when I shoot off parts of the chair I’m using to hold my target :D

– leeanna

Book Review: River Road by Suzanne Johnson

Book Review: River Road by Suzanne JohnsonRiver Road by Suzanne Johnson
Series: Sentinels of New Orleans #2
Published by Tor on November 13, 2012
Genres: Adult, Romance, Urban Fantasy
Pages: 334
Format: eARC
Source: Blog Tour
Goodreads
4 Stars
Hurricane Katrina is long gone, but the preternatural storm rages on in New Orleans. New species from the Beyond moved into Louisiana after the hurricane destroyed the borders between worlds, and it falls to wizard sentinel Drusilla Jaco and her partner, Alex Warin, to keep the preternaturals peaceful and the humans unaware. But a war is brewing between two clans of Cajun merpeople in Plaquemines Parish, and down in the swamp, DJ learns, there’s more stirring than angry mermen and the threat of a were-gator.

Wizards are dying, and something—or someone—from the Beyond is poisoning the waters of the mighty Mississippi, threatening the humans who live and work along the river. DJ and Alex must figure out what unearthly source is contaminating the water and who—or what—is killing the wizards. Is it a malcontented merman, the naughty nymph, or some other critter altogether? After all, DJ’s undead suitor, the pirate Jean Lafitte, knows his way around a body or two.

It’s anything but smooth sailing on the bayou as the Sentinels of New Orleans series continues.

Book Review:

The second book in the Sentinels of New Orleans, RIVER ROAD picks up a couple of years after ROYAL STREET. This is an urban fantasy series set in New Orleans with all manners of preternatural creatures from the historical undead to nymphs to mermen and beyond. This is a series that gets better with each book; I recently read number four, PIRATE’S ALLEY, and reading that sent me back into a reread of the whole series.

Drusilla “DJ” Jaco is the Sentinel of New Orleans, and it’s her job to take care of any magical crises. Thanks to Hurricane Katrina, the borders that kept preternaturals out of the city have fallen, and rather than put them back up, the wizards are keeping an eye on the situation and seeing what happens. Naturally, plenty happens in RIVER ROAD. DJ has to juggle territorial mers, murdered wizards, and a sudden increase of activity in her personal life.

I enjoyed the author’s take on mermen. They’re not the sexy fish you’d expect them to be — no, Suzanne Johnson’s given them her own spin. I had a good laugh at the “Mer Twin” license plates for Rene and Robert. I really liked Rene’s character: he’s a tough guy, and even though mers traditionally hate wizards, he’s willing to work with DJ to keep his clan from getting sick. And all the time DJ spends with the mers shows off Plaquemines Parish, which is just outside of New Orleans.

The murder mystery aspect of RIVER ROAD was interesting to me; you’ll probably never look at the culprit in the same way again. DJ’s efforts in solving the murders and cleaning up the poisoned water showcases the unique magic system in this series. DJ is a Green Congress wizard, meaning she uses potions and rituals and charms, along with plenty of research.

DJ’s dance card is a bit full in this installment, but romance isn’t the main focus of the series. So I didn’t mind DJ’s dates and diversions with the men in her life, and even better — those relationships often tied into the plot of the book.

Socialize with the author:

Suzanne Johnson:
Website
Facebook
Twitter

– leeanna

Waiting on Wednesday: The Aeronaut’s Windlass by Jim Butcher

waiting on wednesday

the aeronaut's windlass by jim butcherThe Aeronaut’s Windlass (The Cinder Spires #1) by Jim Butcher
Release Date: September 29, 2015

Jim Butcher, the #1 New York Times bestselling author of The Dresden Files and the Codex Alera novels, conjures up a new series set in a fantastic world of noble families, steam-powered technology, and magic-wielding warriors…

Since time immemorial, the Spires have sheltered humanity, towering for miles over the mist-shrouded surface of the world. Within their halls, aristocratic houses have ruled for generations, developing scientific marvels, fostering trade alliances, and building fleets of airships to keep the peace.

Captain Grimm commands the merchant ship, Predator. Fiercely loyal to Spire Albion, he has taken their side in the cold war with Spire Aurora, disrupting the enemy’s shipping lines by attacking their cargo vessels. But when the Predator is severely damaged in combat, leaving captain and crew grounded, Grimm is offered a proposition from the Spirearch of Albion—to join a team of agents on a vital mission in exchange for fully restoring Predator to its fighting glory.

And even as Grimm undertakes this dangerous task, he will learn that the conflict between the Spires is merely a premonition of things to come. Humanity’s ancient enemy, silent for more than ten thousand years, has begun to stir once more. And death will follow in its wake…

September is a bit far away, but I just read the sample Roc sent me for THE AERONAUT’S WINDLASS. The sampler only has the Prologue and Chapter One, but I’m hooked. I think this series is going to be full of steamship battles, cool technology, and magic. I haven’t yet read a Jim Butcher book (shame on me!) but THE AERONAUT’S WINDLASS looks like it’ll be a good start to his work!

Socialize with the author:
Website
Twitter

Waiting on Wednesday is hosted by Breaking the Spine.

– leeanna