Book Review: The Queen of the Tearling (The Queen of the Tearling #1) by Erika Johansen

Book Review: The Queen of the Tearling (The Queen of the Tearling #1) by Erika JohansenThe Queen of the Tearling by Erika Johansen
Series: The Queen of the Tearling #1
Published by Harper on July 8, 2014
Genres: Fantasy, New Adult
Pages: 448
Format: ARC
Source: Amazon Vine, Edelweiss
Goodreads
3 Stars
On her nineteenth birthday, Princess Kelsea Raleigh Glynn, raised in exile, sets out on a perilous journey back to the castle of her birth to ascend her rightful throne. Plain and serious, a girl who loves books and learning, Kelsea bears little resemblance to her mother, the vain and frivolous Queen Elyssa. But though she may be inexperienced and sheltered, Kelsea is not defenseless: Around her neck hangs the Tearling sapphire, a jewel of immense magical power; and accompanying her is the Queen’s Guard, a cadre of brave knights led by the enigmatic and dedicated Lazarus. Kelsea will need them all to survive a cabal of enemies who will use every weapon—from crimson-caped assassins to the darkest blood magic—to prevent her from wearing the crown.

Despite her royal blood, Kelsea feels like nothing so much as an insecure girl, a child called upon to lead a people and a kingdom about which she knows almost nothing. But what she discovers in the capital will change everything, confronting her with horrors she never imagined. An act of singular daring will throw Kelsea’s kingdom into tumult, unleashing the vengeance of the tyrannical ruler of neighboring Mortmesne: the Red Queen, a sorceress possessed of the darkest magic. Now Kelsea will begin to discover whom among the servants, aristocracy, and her own guard she can trust.

But the quest to save her kingdom and meet her destiny has only just begun—a wondrous journey of self-discovery and a trial by fire that will make her a legend…if she can survive.

Book Review:

THE QUEEN OF THE TEARLING is a book with a lot of hype behind it. The film rights have already been sold, and supposedly Emma Watson is “attached to star” (whatever that means). Books with so much hype behind them usually fail for me. THE QUEEN OF THE TEARLING is an okay fantasy — it’s not great, it’s not horrible. It’s somewhere in the middle. A very long middle.

I’ll address the length of this book first: it’s over 400 pages. I swear it’s 200 pages too long. Now, don’t get me wrong — I read a lot of epic fantasy. Books that I could use as bricks. Books that have 800 or 900 pages, and I want another 800 or 900 pages because I love the characters and the world. Not so with THE QUEEN OF THE TEARLING. There are a lot of boring bits that I wanted to skim, parts that could have been pared down or left out altogether. There’s an abundance of detail, describing what Kelsea has for dinner or what a building looks like.

Too much detail, and not enough worldbuilding, because I was super confused on how the Tearling and other countries came to be. At first, it seems like a standard European-based medieval fantasy, but then there’s a mention of the Harry Potter series. The Tearling supposedly started as a utopia, but somehow it’s now a medieval world complete with serfdom and slaves. There are vague mentions of “The Crossing,” which I guess is when Americans crossed into the Tearling, but it’s not given enough explanation. And, oh yeah, all the doctors were on the same boat, so when that boat sank, so did all medical knowledge. Riiiiight. The more I think about the world in this book, the more confused I get.

I could say more critical stuff about this book, but … even with the multiple issues I had (beyond length and worldbuilding), I actually did get into THE QUEEN OF THE TEARLING. It’s not a memorable book, but the author did rouse my curiosity enough for me to want to see what happens next. I just hope the follow-up makes more sense and isn’t as wordy.

So, in conclusion: an average fantasy.

– leeanna

Monthly Summary: June 2014


in june…

In June I read 18 books. For a while I was averaging a book a day, then I decided to finish Jacqueline Carey’s Imriel Trilogy and Moirin Trilogy. KUSHIEL’S DART is one of my favorite, favorite books of all time, and I’ve read the Phèdre Trilogy countless times. I never read the next two trilogies set in the same world, but I finally have … to the tune of approximately 7,171 pages. I kind of want to do a video, because I have feels for this series (and they’re older books, which I want to promote), but I’m worried about butchering the characters’ names.

I’ll think about it. I keep coming up with possible vlog topics but never actually sit down and do them. I always feel like a dork when I make videos. Any tips on how not to feel dorky?

And with that, here are the books I read:

   

Reviews Posted:

Sea of Shadows (Age of Legends #1) by Kelley Armstrong.
Unwrapped Sky (Caeli-Amur #1) by Rjurik Davidson.
Life in Motion by Misty Copeland.
Deadly Curiosities (Deadly Curiosities #1) by Gail Z. Martin.
Avalon (Avalon #1) by Mindee Arnett.
Dark Metropolis (Dark Metropolis #1) by Jaclyn Dolamore.
The Mark of the Dragonfly by Jaleigh Johnson.
White Heart of Justice (Noon Onyx #3) by Jill Archer.
The Herald (The Sundering #6) by Ed Greenwood.
Essence (Essence #1) by Lisa Ann O’Kane.
Fiery Edge of Steel (Noon Onyx #2) by Jill Archer.


in july…

I planned to start this on July 1, but good intentions and all that… I also got a wicked sunburn that is currently making me feel like a crocodile. Anywho!

For the rest of July, I’m going to try to visit at least 5 blogs a day and comment, as a way of getting back into being more involved in the book blogosphere. I haven’t been very social lately, and it’s kind of weird but also kind of nice to be disconnected. The main benefit is my TBR pile hasn’t really grown. Hah!

– leeanna

Book Review: The Forever Song (Blood of Eden #3) by Julie Kagawa

Book Review: The Forever Song (Blood of Eden #3) by Julie KagawaThe Forever Song by Julie Kagawa
Series: Blood of Eden #3
Published by Harlequin Teen on April 15, 2014
Genres: Dystopian, Paranormal, Romance, Young Adult
Pages: 393
Format: eARC
Source: Amazon Vine, NetGalley
Goodreads
3 Stars
Vengeance will be hers.

Allison Sekemoto once struggled with the question: human or monster? With the death of her love, Zeke, she has her answer.

Monster.

Allie will embrace her cold vampire side to hunt down and end Sarren, the psychopathic vampire who murdered Zeke. But the trail is bloody and long, and Sarren has left many surprises for Allie and her companions - her creator Kanin, and her blood brother, Jackal. The trail is leading straight to the one place they must protect at any cost - the last vampire-free zone on Earth, Eden. And Sarren has one final, brutal shock in store for Allie.

In a ruined world where no life is sacred and former allies can turn on you in one heartbeat, Allie will face her darkest days. And if she succeeds, her triumph will be short-lived in the face of surviving forever alone.

THE FINAL HUNT IS ON.

Book Review:

Over the past few years I’ve been reviewing books, I’ve noticed a pattern: I usually don’t read the last book of a trilogy. I almost wish I hadn’t read THE FOREVER SONG, because it just wasn’t the best end to the series. I feel like I could have stopped with book two, THE ETERNITY CURE, as THE FOREVER SONG was mostly unnecessary. You can predict how the series will end, and the journey to the ending is rather boring at times.

At 393 pages, I swear the book could have been cut in half and told the same story, since so much of it was repetition: tons of travel, tons of rabid attacks, and tons of angst from Allie and Zeke. As with THE ETERNITY CURE, Jackal was the highlight of THE FOREVER SONG for me. I could quote line after line of his dialogue; he’s a perfect combination of dry wit, sarcasm, and unabashed vampireness. Unlike Allie, who is still adjusting to the fact that she’s a vampire and has to drink blood to survive, Jackal would paint a town red. Not in a crazy way like psychotic Sarren, but just because he would enjoy it.

Here’s an example, one of many I bookmarked:

“‘There you go again.’ Jackal sighed from the front. ‘Getting the puppy’s hopes up. More likely, every bloodbag in Eden is screaming and tearing their faces off, but oh, no, no one wants to hear that.’ He waved a hand. ‘So, go ahead, tell him that everything is going to be fine. All the meatsacks are perfectly content on their happy little island, Sarren has given up world destruction to raise kittens, and the magic wish fairy will wave her wand and turn shit into gold.’ (page 235).”

Don’t you just love Jackal? I do!

For the climactic book of a series, I guess I expected more than Allie and Zeke spending most of the book angsting over their vampire lives. The cure was almost stupidly simple, and it seems to me it’s something where the journey is more important than the end product type of things. But I just wish that journey hadn’t included so much traveling and repetition. One of the things that really captured my interest in this series was the bleak, dark, dystopian society Julie Kagawa created. One where vampires were the absolute power, and humans spent all of their time trying to find enough food to eat. I wanted to see more of that, or at least more of Eden, but no. It really felt like 97% of the book was spent on the long, dull road.

In the end, I’m just meh on THE FOREVER SONG. For me, it didn’t live up to the first two books in the series. It’s not a bad conclusion, but it was just missing something for me to feel really good about the end of the series.

Socialize with the author:
Julie Kagawa:
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– leeanna

Book Review: The Bone Church by Victoria Dougherty

Book Review: The Bone Church by Victoria DoughertyThe Bone Church by Victoria Dougherty
Published by Pier's Court Press on April 15, 2014
Genres: Historical Fiction, Romance, Thriller
Pages: 308
Format: eARC
Source: Blog Tour, NetGalley
Goodreads
4 Stars
In the surreal and paranoid underworld of wartime Prague, fugitive lovers Felix Andel and Magdalena Ruza make some dubious alliances – with a mysterious Roman Catholic cardinal, a reckless sculptor intent on making a big political statement, and a gypsy with a risky sex life. As one by one their chances for fleeing the country collapse, the two join a plot to assassinate Hitler’s nefarious Minister of Public Enlightenment and Propaganda, Josef Goebbels.

But the assassination attempt goes wildly wrong, propelling the lovers in separate directions.

Felix’s destiny is sealed at the Bone Church, a mystical pilgrimage site on the outskirts of Prague, while Magdalena is thrust even deeper into the bowels of a city that betrayed her and a homeland soon to be swallowed by the Soviets. As they emerge from the shadowy fog of World War II, and stagger into the foul haze of the Cold War, Felix and Magdalena must confront the past, and a dangerous, uncertain future.

bone church blog tour

Welcome to my stop on the blog tour for THE BONE CHURCH by Victoria Dougherty. It’s a historical thriller set during the Cold War and WWII.

The tour is hosted by Historical Fiction Virtual Book Tours and you can visit all the stops here.

Book Review:

THE BONE CHURCH is my kind of historical fiction. Beautifully written with compelling characters, an intriguing, twisty plotline, and full of historical details. I love it when a book interests me enough in the subject matter to make me want to learn alllllll about what I’m reading. For example — Google “the Bone Church.” I bet the pictures you see will make you want to read this book, especially once I tell you there’s a very important part of the book set in the Bone Church.

THE BONE CHURCH seamlessly melds two timelines together, 1956 and 1943-1944. In both times, Felix and Magdalena are trying to escape Czechoslovakia, from the Germans and then from the Soviets. In 1943, Felix accidentally gets caught up in an attempt to assassinate Josef Goebbels. In 1956, he’s a Jesuit working with a corrupt cardinal to smuggle people out of Soviet controlled countries. In both times, Felix’s goal is to rescue Magdalena.

The whole time I was reading THE BONE CHURCH, I had no idea what was going to happen next. I always enjoy that, because it’s no fun to predict the end before you finish the book. The author continually surprised me with every twist and turn. She also made me feel like I was right there, hiding behind Felix’s shoulder, waiting for the next spat of gunfire. The author didn’t shy away from describing the worst of humanity and living conditions, but in a way that left you with a tiny bit of hope. Aside from feeling like I was in war torn Czechoslovakia, I also felt the paranoia of everyone involved, not knowing who to trust, and of having no choice but to trust, to put your life in someone else’s hands.

The book is gritty and dark, maybe even hard to read at times because Felix and Magdalena face overwhelming odds and incredibly dangerous situations. But along with the spark of hope that runs through the book, Felix has some angelic help. While some of the religious aspects probably went over my head, I thought everything tied together really well. I do wish the ending had more on what Felix and Magdalena face in the future, but looking back, I can’t really imagine a different ending.

About the author:

author victoria doughertyVictoria Dougherty writes fiction, drama, and essays that often revolve around spies, killers, curses and destinies. Her work has been published or profiled in The New York Times, USA Today, International Herald Tribune and elsewhere. Earlier in her career, while living in Prague, she co-founded Black Box Theater, translating, producing and acting in several Czech plays. She lives with her husband and children in Charlottesville, Virginia.

 

Buy links: Amazon UK | Amazon US | B&N | Book Depository | IndieBound

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– leeanna

Book Review: Sea of Shadows (Age of Legends #1) by Kelley Armstrong

Book Review: Sea of Shadows (Age of Legends #1) by Kelley ArmstrongSea of Shadows by Kelley Armstrong
Series: Age of Legends #1
Published by HarperCollins on April 8, 2014
Genres: Fantasy, Romance, Young Adult
Pages: 416
Format: ARC
Source: Amazon Vine, Edelweiss
Goodreads
2 Stars
In the Forest of the Dead, where the empire’s worst criminals are exiled, twin sisters Moria and Ashyn are charged with a dangerous task. For they are the Keeper and the Seeker, and each year they must quiet the enraged souls of the damned.

Only this year, the souls will not be quieted.

Ambushed and separated by an ancient evil, the sisters’ journey to find each other sends them far from the only home they’ve ever known. Accompanied by a stubborn imperial guard and a dashing condemned thief, the girls cross a once-empty wasteland, now filled with reawakened monsters of legend, as they travel to warn the emperor. But a terrible secret awaits them at court—one that will alter the balance of their world forever.

Book Review:

I finished SEA OF SHADOWS a few days ago, but I barely remember it. I would have written my review right after finishing, but I was really underwhelmed by the book and didn’t know what to say. Unfortunately, I still don’t know what to say, which is indicative to me that the book was, well, blah.

SEA OF SHADOWS is basically set up for the rest of the series. Almost an entire book of exposition. While I was reading, I kept wondering when something big or exciting or important was going to happen. Now, don’t get me wrong — there are battles, there’s some danger, a village even gets slaughtered. But it was all …. disjointed and slow. When I finally finished the book, I almost felt cheated because I expected more from such a best selling author.

If you’re a fan of Game of Thrones, I’m pretty sure you’ll be disappointed by this book. It’s just not on that scope. The romance is also the farthest thing possible from “heart-stopping,” although I did appreciate Moria’s attitude towards boys. She didn’t care for romance, but also didn’t see anything wrong with having some fun and experimenting if the time was right.

The world in SEA OF SHADOWS is some combination of post-apocalyptic setting, historical fiction, and fantasy, but I needed a lot more worldbuilding. The characters were also flat and 2-dimensional. Moria and Ashyn have alternating chapters, but their voices were very similar, with Moria being the headstrong, kickass warrior and Ashyn the nicer, romantic thinker. And don’t get me started on the love interests. I wanted to slap everyone and ask them WTF they were doing, falling “in love” days after almost everyone they know has been killed. Let’s try being friends first, and concentrate on the big picture, okay?

All that said, would I continue this series? Maybe. I am curious about what will happen next, and to see what the author has in mind with the world. That’s why I gave SEA OF SHADOWS 2 stars instead of 1 star.

Socialize with the author:

Kelley Armstrong:
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– leeanna

Book Review: Unwrapped Sky (Caeli-Amur #1) by Rjurik Davidson

Book Review: Unwrapped Sky (Caeli-Amur #1) by Rjurik DavidsonUnwrapped Sky by Rjurik Davidson
Series: Caeli-Amur #1
Published by Tor on April 15, 2014
Genres: Fantasy
Pages: 430
Format: eARC
Source: NetGalley
Goodreads
3 Stars
Caeli-Amur: an ancient city perched on white cliffs overlooking the sea; a city ruled by three Houses, fighting internecine wars; a city which harbours ancient technology and hidden mysteries. But things are changing in Caeli-Amur. Ancient minotaurs arrive for the traditional Festival of the Sun. The slightly built New-Men bring their technology from their homeland. Wastelanders stream into the city hideously changed by the chemical streams to the north. Strikes break out in the factory district.

In a hideout beneath the city, a small group of seditionists debate ways to overthrow the Houses. How can they rouse the citizens of the city? Should they begin a campaign of terror? Is there a way to uncover the thaumaturgical knowledge that the Houses guard so jealously? As the Houses scramble to maintain their rule, it becomes clear that things will change forever in Caeli-Amur.

Book Review:

I really thought UNWRAPPED SKY was going to be about minotaurs. Given that there’s a minotaur on the cover, and they’re mentioned in the summary, I figured that was a safe assumption. Unfortunately, they play a small role in what I’d call a philosophical fantasy.

UNWRAPPED SKY took me two attempts to read. The first time I wasn’t expecting such a serious book, so I had trouble getting into it and ended up restarting the book about a month after I first picked it up. The second time I knew what to expect, and had an easier time, although I did end up skimming some of the passages dealing with the different philosophies. The seditionists who wanted to overthrow the House system were a bit too thinky for me at times, but then, I tend to prefer physical action to mental.

The book is told from the perspective of three different characters, each in a different place in society in Caeli-Amur. Kata is a philosopher-assassin, an orphan trained to be useful in the debt of House Technis. Boris, a former tramworker, has risen higher than his fellows in the service of House Technis. Maximilian is a seditionist, devoted to overthrowing the House system. In Caeli-Amur, three Houses control the city, much like a feudal lord controlling his lands.

Honestly, the political aspects of UNWRAPPED SKY didn’t interest me all that much. There’s a lot of buildup and debating about power, human nature — that type of thing. None of the characters in the book are particularly good, but there’s something to sympathize about for each of them. As I said before, I sometimes skimmed when the characters got too cerebral, too into discussing how to change things or why the system worked (depending on the perspective). But something always came along that re-hooked my interest and made me keep reading.

I read fantasy for escapism, to lose myself in new worlds. In that aspect, the book was fascinating. I really enjoyed the world, which had fantasy and steampunk elements, as well as an interesting mythology. The idea of philosopher assassins? Super cool. I also liked the author’s writing style, which was quite descriptive without being purple prose. I felt like I was in Caeli-Amur watching everything unfold.

Although I didn’t love UNWRAPPED SKY, I would continue the series, as I enjoyed the world and am curious about what will come next for everyone. Book two, THE STARS ASKEW, will be published in 2015.

Socialize with the author:

Rjurik Davidson:
Website

– leeanna

Book Review: Life in Motion by Misty Copeland

Book Review: Life in Motion by Misty CopelandLife in Motion by Misty Copeland
Published by Touchstone on March 4, 2014
Genres: Memoir
Pages: 288
Format: eARC
Source: NetGalley
Goodreads
4 Stars
"Picture a ballerina in a tutu and toe shoes. What does she look like?"

As the only African American soloist dancing with the prestigious American Ballet Theatre, Misty Copeland has made history. But when she first placed her hands on the barre at an after-school community center, no one expected the undersized, anxious thirteen-year-old to become a ground-breaking ballerina.

When she discovered ballet, Misty was living in a shabby motel room, struggling with her five siblings for a place to sleep on the floor. A true prodigy, she was dancing en pointe within three months of taking her first dance class and performing professionally in just over a year: a feat unheard of for any classical dancer. But when Misty became caught between the control and comfort she found in the world of ballet and the harsh realities of her own life (culminating in a highly publicized custody battle), she had to choose to embrace both her identity and her dreams, and find the courage to be one of a kind.

With an insider's unique point of view, Misty opens a window into the life of a professional ballerina who lives life center stage: from behind the scenes at her first auditions to her triumphant roles in some of the most iconic ballets. But in this beautifully written memoir, she also delves deeper to reveal the desire and drive that made her dreams reality.

Life in Motion is a story of passion and grace for anyone who has dared to dream of a different life.

Book Review:

Before reading LIFE IN MOTION, I had never heard of Misty Copeland. But I’m always on the lookout for ballet books, especially books by dancers, so I dove in eagerly. I finished the book in a day, and found it easy to read and interesting. In other words, I’m now happy I know who Misty Copeland is, because she’s had quite the life, and I’ll follow her career in the future.

Misty didn’t come from the typical ballet background. In fact, she didn’t take a ballet class until she was in middle school. She’d always loved dancing and was the captain of the middle school drill team, but ballet? Nah. By fifteen, Misty was considered a prodigy in the ballet world, and had been offered scholarships by top ballet schools. Around the same time, Misty was in the middle of a legal battle between her mother and ballet teacher; the teacher had encouraged Misty to file for self-emancipation to move forward in her ballet career, but Misty’s mother fought to keep her.

Misty’s story is almost like a fairy tale. Only the third African American to be promoted to soloist in the American Ballet Theatre, she came from a life of poverty and struggle. At one point, she and her siblings lived in a motel. She’s had to overcome racism, both subtle and overt, as well as body changes and injuries. Throughout the book, she has a pretty positive attitude about everything, rarely succumbing to pity. It was rather inspiring to read.

I do feel like this book was written early in Misty’s career, because I’m sure she’ll eventually be promoted to a principal dancer. However, I was never bored during LIFE IN MOTION, and really enjoyed reading Misty’s journey.

Socialize with the author:

Misty Copeland:
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– leeanna

Book Review: Deadly Curiosities (Deadly Curiosities #1) by Gail Z. Martin

Book Review: Deadly Curiosities (Deadly Curiosities #1) by Gail Z. MartinDeadly Curiosities by Gail Z. Martin
Series: Deadly Curiosities #1
Published by Solaris on June 24, 2014
Genres: Urban Fantasy
Pages: 464
Format: eARC
Source: Publisher
Goodreads
3 Stars
Cassidy Kincaide owns Trifles & Folly, an antique/curio store and high-end pawn shop in Charleston, South Carolina that is more than what it seems. Dangerous magical and supernatural items sometimes find their way into mortal hands or onto the market, and Cassidy is part of a shadowy Alliance of mortals and mages whose job it is to take those deadly curiosities out of circulation.

Welcome to Trifles & Folly, an antique and curio shop with a dark secret. Proprietor Cassidy Kincaide continues a family tradition begun in 1670—acquiring and neutralizing dangerous supernatural items. It’s the perfect job for Cassidy, whose psychic gift lets her touch an object and know its history. Together with her business partner Sorren, a 500 year-old vampire and former jewel thief, Cassidy makes it her business to get infernal objects off the market. When mundane antiques suddenly become magically malicious, it’s time for Cassidy and Sorren to get rid of these Deadly Curiosities before the bodies start piling up.

Book Review:

DEADLY CURIOSITIES is the first in a new urban fantasy series set in Charleston, South Carolina. The book features Cassidy Kincaide, a psychometric who owns an antique shop. Trifles and Folly is the perfect cover for Cassidy, her assistant Teag, and her vampire partner Sorren to get dangerous supernatural objects off the market. Because Cassidy can read emotions and memories from objects, she can tell if something is dangerous or not, and take appropriate action.

When she learns that several objects she thought were safe are now causing trouble at a bed and breakfast, it’s just the tip of the iceberg. Soon Cassidy, Teag, and Sorren are up to their eyeballs in objects that are haunted by evil ghosts, an enemy from Sorren’s past, and something even more dangerous than a crazy, half-dead wizard: a demon.

DEADLY CURIOSITIES does a couple of things very well. There are some great ideas in this book, like Cassidy’s psychometric powers which allow her to use magical objects for protection, such as the collar from her favorite dog for a ghostly guardian. Teag has some magic of his own: Weaving, which helps him find tons of information on the normal Internet and the “Darke Web,” the magical version of the information highway. There’s no romance in this book, which I really appreciated — I hate when the paranormal fun takes a backseat to googly eyes and making out. I also really enjoyed the story behind DEADLY CURIOSITIES. It was fun to watch the gang try to solve the mystery. I also liked the history the author created. I mean, you can’t go wrong with pirates and ghosts and tragic history!

But there were a couple of things that didn’t work so well for me. I think the book was just too long. The author’s other books are epic fantasies, clocking in at 600 pages or so. DEADLY CURIOSITIES is 464 pages. I expect urban fantasies to be shorter, for the plot to move faster. I thought the book lagged a bit, with some unnecessary scenes and slow buildup. The writing also contributed to that feeling — the author was great at historical flashbacks of objects, but dialogue and pacing weren’t so on for me.

Overall, DEADLY CURIOSITIES is an intriguing start to a new series. I would definitely read more of Cassidy, Teag, and Sorren’s adventures, and would like to learn more about their world.

Socialize with the author:

Gail Z. Martin:
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– leeanna

Book Review: Avalon (Avalon #1) by Mindee Arnett

Book Review: Avalon (Avalon #1) by Mindee ArnettAvalon by Mindee Arnett
Series: Avalon #1
Published by Balzer & Bray on January 21, 2014
Genres: Romance, Science Fiction, Young Adult
Pages: 418
Format: ARC
Source: Amazon Vine, Edelweiss
Goodreads
2 Stars
A ragtag group of teenage mercenaries who crew the spaceship Avalon stumble upon a conspiracy that could threaten the entire galaxy in this fascinating and fast-paced sci-fi adventure from author Mindee Arnett.

Of the various star systems that make up the Confederation, most lie thousands of light-years from First Earth-and out here, no one is free. The agencies that govern the Confederation are as corrupt as the crime bosses who patrol it, and power is held by anyone with enough greed and ruthlessness to claim it. That power is derived from one thing: metatech, the devices that allow people to travel great distances faster than the speed of light.

Jeth Seagrave and his crew of teenage mercenaries have survived in this world by stealing unsecured metatech, and they're damn good at it. Jeth doesn't care about the politics or the law; all he cares about is earning enough money to buy back his parents' ship, Avalon, from his crime-boss employer and getting himself and his sister, Lizzie, the heck out of Dodge. But when Jeth finds himself in possession of information that both the crime bosses and the government are willing to kill for, he is going to have to ask himself how far he'll go to get the freedom he's wanted for so long.

Avalon is the perfect fit for teens new to sci-fi as well as seasoned sci-fi readers looking for more books in the YA space-and a great match for fans of Joss Whedon's cult hit show Firefly.

Book Review:

Over the years, various friends have tried to get me to watch Joss Whedon’s Firefly. However, I’d rather read books than watch TV series. So when I saw AVALON described for fans of Firefly, I thought this would be the book for me.

Unfortunately, I wish I’d skipped reading AVALON and watched Firefly instead.

Jeth leads a crew of teenage starship thieves. Working for one of the biggest crime lords in the galaxy, they steal metatech. Metatech allows other criminals or people who don’t want the attention of the Interstellar Transport Authority to travel across great distances in the blink of an eye. But when they steal a ship with a busted metadrive, Jeth and his crew find themselves in the middle of a very, very big problem.

AVALON just didn’t capture my attention. The beginning and middle were slow. Any time I put the book down, I didn’t feel compelled to pick it back up and find out how it ended. I did persevere, though, and thought the ending had way too much going on compared to the rest of the book. Jeth didn’t interest me, either. He works for the crime lord because his uncle gambled away his parents’ ship, Avalon, and he wants to buy her back. Of course, it’s not so easy as that, but I didn’t feel for Jeth and his predicament.

Ultimately, AVALON just wasn’t exciting for me. It was okay, but not the great YA sci-fi book I thought it would be. This is one series I won’t be continuing.

Socialize with the author:

Mindee Arnett:
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– leeanna

Book Review: Dark Metropolis (Dark Metropolis #1) by Jaclyn Dolamore

Book Review: Dark Metropolis (Dark Metropolis #1) by Jaclyn DolamoreDark Metropolis by Jaclyn Dolamore
Series: Dark Metropolis #1
Published by Disney Hyperion on June 17, 2014
Genres: Fantasy, LGBT, Paranormal, Young Adult
Pages: 301
Format: eARC
Source: Blog Tour, NetGalley
Goodreads
3 Stars
Sixteen-year-old Thea Holder's mother is cursed with a spell that's driving her mad, and whenever they touch, Thea is chilled by the magic, too. With no one else to contribute, Thea must make a living for both of them in a sinister city, where danger lurks and greed rules.
Thea spends her nights waitressing at the decadent Telephone Club attending to the glitzy clientele. But when her best friend, Nan, vanishes, Thea is compelled to find her. She meets Freddy, a young, magnetic patron at the club, and he agrees to help her uncover the city's secrets-even while he hides secrets of his own.

Together, they find a whole new side of the city. Unrest is brewing behind closed doors as whispers of a gruesome magic spread. And if they're not careful, the heartless masterminds behind the growing disappearances will be after them, too.

dark metropolis blog tour

Welcome to my stop on the blog tour for DARK METROPOLIS by Jaclyn Dolamore. The tour is hosted by Itching For Books and you can visit all the stops here. After my review, there’s a tour-wide giveaway.

Book Review:

DARK METROPOLIS is the first book in a new duology set in an alternate version of Berlin in the late 1920s. Featuring three protagonists, the book digs into the dark underbelly of the city which is kept running by government-sanctioned zombies.

The summary for the book is a little misleading in my opinion, as it gives the impression Thea is the only main character. But her friend, Nan, and Freddy also tell parts of the story. I would have liked to see more character development for all three; DARK METROPOLIS is more plot-driven than character-driven. Characters are usually what I like most about a book, but something in this one hooked me and kept me reading.

Thea’s mother suffers from bound-sickness because she and her husband were magically bonded when they were married. But while he went missing eight years ago and was declared dead in the war, Thea’s mother has always insisted he’s still alive. Being unable to find her husband makes her mentally sick, and though Thea’s tried to take care of her mother, it’s getting harder and harder. One night at work, Thea touches the hand of club goer Freddy and sees a vision of her father sitting up. Is her mother right? Is her father alive?

When her friend and co-worker, Nan, goes missing, Thea asks Freddy for helping finding her. And that’s where things get freaky, because Freddy brought Nan back to life. He’s a necromancer and has brought thousands of people back to life. He was always told those people committed suicide, but when Thea insists Nan never would have killed herself, Freddy starts to investigate.

DARK METROPOLIS is a zombie story I actually liked. I typically don’t read a lot of horror, which is what I’d classify most zombie books as. Yeah, there’s some violence in this one, and some gruesome imagery, but the book is more fantasy/magic/paranormal than horror. The real horror comes from the manipulation of necromancy and the zombies’ living conditions.

I do wish there was more worldbuilding, because we’re given a few hints about the world, but not too many. The setting does feel very 1920s/1930s ish, but with an added element of magic. I did like how the author explored necromancy, and how there were consequences for doing such magic. But I wish more had been mentioned. For example, what was the war about? How did its outcome lead to the government outlawing magic?

Thea’s family relationship was probably my favorite thing about the whole book. I felt the love they all had for each other, and while I’m not going to spoil it, I liked the outcome. The other relationships in the book — Thea and Freddy, Nan and Sigi — could have used more development, just like the characters. The romantic relationships aren’t really a big portion of the book, though, so that didn’t really bug me. I was happy that Sigi kissed Nan at a very important moment, since I saw their potential relationship coming from their first meeting.

DARK METROPOLIS doesn’t end on a cliffhanger, which is refreshing. The main story is wrapped up by the end, leaving a few loose ends for the next book, due out in 2015.

Giveaway:

a Rafflecopter giveaway

*giveaway is tour-wide

About the author:

author jaclyn dolamoreJaclyn Dolamore was homeschooled in a hippie sort of way and spent her childhood reading as many books as her skinny nerd-body could lug from the library and playing elaborate pretend games with her sister Kate. She skipped college and spent eight years drudging through retail jobs, developing her thrifty cooking skills and pursuing a lifelong writing dream. She has a passion for history, thrift stores, vintage dresses, David Bowie, drawing, and organic food. She lives with her partner and plot-sounding-board, Dade, and two black tabbies who have ruined her carpeting.
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– leeanna