Book Review: Shameless by Nina Lemay

Book Review: Shameless by Nina LemayShameless by Nina Lemay
Published by Self-Published on August 18, 2014
Genres: Contemporary, New Adult, Romance
Pages: 277
Format: eARC
Source: Author, Blog Tour
Goodreads
3 Stars
Girls like me don’t get happy endings.

I know what I am. At worst a cliché, at best a cautionary tale. I put an international border between me and my past, only to wind up working in a low-end titty bar. Even my excuse is as lame as it gets: I’m paying for college, getting my art degree from Montreal’s most prestigious school. Although some days it becomes confusing: am I just a student who moonlights as a stripper, or a stripper who masquerades as a student?

But the inevitable happens and my two lives collide. And now there’s one other person who knows both the quiet, antisocial Hannah and the sensual, shameless Alicia. One person who keeps my secret.

He’s beautiful, he’s sophisticated. He comes from the other side of life, the one where I’m not wanted or accepted. But he calls me la petite Américaine, and his hot, hot hands on my skin promise me things I long ago gave up on.

The problem? He teaches my Classic Photography class.

shameless by nina lemay blog tour

Welcome to my stop on the blog tour for SHAMELESS by Nina Lemay. The tour is hosted by Itching For Books and you can visit all the stops here. After my review, there’s a tour-wide giveaway.

Book Review:

The summary for SHAMELESS drew me in. A pessimist stripping to pay her way through college? A girl who gets the shock of her life when a guy she gave a lap dance to shows up as her photography professor? Yum! I like some “forbidden” relationships, and this one has two. I also liked the cover, since I could see Hannah as the girl on the cover. Photography plays a big role in SHAMELESS, so I think the cover style was a great choice.

For the most part, I enjoyed SHAMELESS. I liked Hannah. She always sees the worst in things, expects bad things to happen, and doesn’t glamorize her life as a stripper. It’s just something she’s doing to pay for school, and yeah, she recognizes that’s a huge cliche. Too bad. She likes financial independence. I liked that she wanted to take advantage of men looking at her, and that she was shameless about her job choice.

Hannah’s not in a great place in her life. I would say it’s possible she’s depressed, just going through the motions. Until Emmanuel shows up, in the club and then at school. The two are drawn together, and while Hannah is at first worried Emmanuel will spill her secret, he shows her otherwise when he rescues her from a bad clubbing night. I did think their relationship progressed very quickly. Emmanuel is an incredibly sweet guy, and I could tell he wanted the best for Hannah. I could see why she liked him, but I wasn’t sure why Emmanuel was drawn to Hannah. I mean, Emmanuel offers to do some crazy things so they can date without it causing trouble, but I’m still not sure why. A bit more development for both Hannah and Emmanuel would have really helped me believe in their relationship, but once I got past that, I did enjoy seeing them together.

Some of the things that happened are maybe a tad unbelievable, but I can’t really go into those without spoiling way too much of the book. So, to be incredibly vague, I could sort of believe what happened, but I would have believed it a lot more if Hannah’s tragic past had been … more tragic. She’s hiding a big secret about why she thinks most guys hate women, but when the reveal came, I expected it to be … bigger.

SHAMELESS is set in Canada, Montreal to be exact. I appreciated a book set outside of the U.S., and enjoyed the author’s descriptions for Montreal and especially Quebec City. I do wish an explanation for a couple French Canadian terms had been provided, but a quick trip to Urban Dictionary helped out.

I think what I liked most about SHAMELESS was that Hannah didn’t let anyone change her. You don’t like that she’s a stripper? Fuck you. I absolutely loved her final photography project, and what it shows about others’ attitudes regarding stripping and women. And thanks to the author’s good descriptions, I could actually “see” each photo.

Giveaway:

a Rafflecopter giveaway

*giveaway is tour-wide

About the author:

author nina lemayNina Lemay is a YA writer by day and author of sinfully twisted New Adult…well, also by day. She loves all things dark and edgy and never tires of tormenting her characters. While Nina is a fan of all things scary, Gothic, and fantastic, she doesn’t shy away from a gritty contemporary romance when the muse strikes. She lives in Montreal, a city that never fails to inspire, with her partner and her dog.
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– leeanna

Book Review: After the End (After the End #1) by Amy Plum

Book Review: After the End (After the End #1) by Amy PlumAfter the End by Amy Plum
Series: After the End #1
Published by HarperTeen on May 6, 2014
Genres: Paranormal, Post-Apocalyptic, Romance, Young Adult
Pages: 352
Format: ARC
Source: Amazon Vine, Edelweiss
Goodreads
3 Stars
She’s searching for answers to her past. They’re hunting her to save their future.

World War III has left the world ravaged by nuclear radiation. A lucky few escaped to the Alaskan wilderness. They've survived for the last thirty years by living off the land, being one with nature, and hiding from whoever else might still be out there.

At least, this is what Juneau has been told her entire life.

When Juneau returns from a hunting trip to discover that everyone in her clan has vanished, she sets off to find them. Leaving the boundaries of their land for the very first time, she learns something horrifying: There never was a war. Cities were never destroyed. The world is intact. Everything was a lie.

Now Juneau is adrift in a modern-day world she never knew existed. But while she's trying to find a way to rescue her friends and family, someone else is looking for her. Someone who knows the extraordinary truth about the secrets of her past.

Book Review:

At first, AFTER THE END was a great book for me. At the start, Juneau lives in Alaska, presumably one of the few people left alive after the third world war. She and her clan live close to the land, and believe in the Yara, a current that connects all beings. Juneau is being groomed to be the clan’s next Sage, the one who will read the Yara for news of bad weather, good hunting, and brigands.

But on a routine hunting trip, Juneau sees planes. Planes mean danger, so she rushes home … only to find her entire clan gone. They’ve been taken. Juneau rushes off to rescue them, and rushes right into the modern world. Everything she’s been told, everything she believes, is a lie. There was no WWIII. The world didn’t end.

All of this? Pretty cool. The beginning of the book took me a couple of tries, because I didn’t totally understand the Yara concept, but after that, I was hooked. It was fun to see Juneau try to make sense of the modern world. As odd as it is for her, she also has to deal with the armed guys who are after her, so there’s a lot to figure out at once.

AFTER THE END alternates chapters between Juneau and Miles. On the surface, Miles is a stereotypical rich American teenager. But in an effort to prove himself to his dad, he takes off to Seattle to try and find the girl his dad is looking for — Juneau.

When Juneau and Mike meet up, that’s where AFTER THE END started to lose its shine for me. Basically, they take a long road trip. There’s a lot of self-doubt, learning about the modern world, driving, a cool raven named Poe, lots of driving, crushing on each other, more driving, and then some romance. The last three quarters of the book I had to push myself to keep reading. There were a few exciting parts, but mostly it was a long road trip. Or that’s my impression, anyway. And then after all the road tripping, the book ends on a cliffhanger. I wasn’t pleased.

The beginning of AFTER THE END was different a good, a new twist on the popular post-apocalypse setting. If the whole book had been like that, I would have enjoyed it a lot more. But after Juneau and Mike meet up, it felt way more contemporary, with more focus on romance.

Socialize with the author:

Amy Plum:
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– leeanna

Book Review: Adagio (The Company #1) by Delancey Stewart

Book Review: Adagio (The Company #1) by Delancey StewartAdagio by Delancey Stewart
Series: The Company #1
Published by Self-Published on May 6, 2014
Genres: Contemporary, New Adult, Romance
Pages: 205
Format: eARC
Source: Blog Tour
Goodreads
3 Stars
The world of professional ballet is built on illusion. The illusion of perfection. The illusion of effortless beauty. The illusion of eternal love.

But backstage, few members of the Union Ballet Company suffer from such illusions.

Anna Glaser has dreamed of nothing but dancing professionally her entire life. And when she’s finally offered a position with Union, she takes it, giving little more than a passing thought to what she might have to give up in exchange. But Sebastian Kaplan, the director who gave her the chance, won’t forget so easily.

When Anna meets Cain, who has been dubbed by the local media as Union’s most eligible bachelor, she realizes that making a deal with the devil might mean that Heaven — in the form of a gorgeous dark-haired man — is forever out of her reach.

Dancers at Union know that something that glitters and shines under the stage lights can still be vicious and evil when the lights go down.

Adagio is the first episode in the series The Company – an engaging drama-filled ride through the darker parts of the ballet and the lives of those who live to dance.

*This book contains explicit content and is suitable for readers over 17

adagio blog tour

Welcome to my stop on the tour for ADAGIO by Delancey Stewart. If you’ve been around here for a while, you might know I like ballet books, so I was excited to check this one out.

The tour is hosted by Xpresso Book Tours and you can visit all the stops here. After my review, there’s a tour-wide givewaway.

Book Review:

ADAGIO dives into the dark aspects of ballet within the opening pages. At her audition to dance with the Union Ballet Company, the director offers her a private audition to show she really belongs. Sebastian wants to know how far she’ll go to dance, if she will do anything necessary. Anna jumps at the chance to make her dreams come true, but later wonders if she did the wrong thing, and what Sebastian will want in return.

Anna lives to dance. The order and devotion required to succeed keep away the nightmares and problems in her past. But when she joins Union, Sebastian’s manipulations, company politics, and a possible romance with a fellow dancer shake up everything. Suddenly, dance isn’t the refuge it’s always been. Sebastian pushes Anna almost to her breaking point, but not everyone is content to watch him be a controlling bastard.

There’s a lot going on in ADAGIO, more than just Anna’s dealings with Sebastian and her romance with Cain. I think some of the side stories were unnecessary, and took focus away from really developing Anna and Cain, and their relationship. For example, Anna was taken advantage of in the past, which has made her uncomfortable around men. The first time she tries to be with Cain, she can’t go through with it. Once he learns why, Cain is super understanding, is willing to wait, and wants to help Anna get over her past. But it doesn’t take very long for Anna to practically jump Cain, which I found a tad unrealistic. Otherwise, I thought the relationship between the two was really sweet, and I liked the little things Cain did, like buy groceries and make sure she got home safe every night.

At 205 pages, ADAGIO is a quick read. I like books set in the ballet world, so this was good for me. I read it in one sitting, because I wanted to know what would happen with controlling Sebastian, to see if Anna would succumb or triumph. I also wanted to “see” the ballet the company works towards putting on, a steampunk version of Coppélia. I think there’s a good balance of dance life and real life in ADAGIO, and it’s a good start to a series.

Giveaway:

a Rafflecopter giveaway

*giveaway is tour-wide

About the author:

delancey stewartDelancey Stewart writes contemporary romance.

Stewart has lived on both coasts, in big cities and small towns. She’s been a pharmaceutical rep, a personal trainer and a direct sales representative for a French wine importer. But she has always been a writer first.

A military spouse and the mother of two small boys, her current job titles include pirate captain, monster hunter, Lego assembler and story reader. She tackles all these efforts at her current home outside Washington D.C.
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Buy: Amazon

– leeanna

Book Review: Graduation Day (The Testing #3) by Joelle Charbonneau

Book Review: Graduation Day (The Testing #3) by Joelle CharbonneauGraduation Day by Joelle Charbonneau
Series: The Testing #3
Published by HMH Books for Young Readers on June 17, 2014
Genres: Dystopian, Post-Apocalyptic, Young Adult
Pages: 304
Format: ARC
Source: Amazon Vine
Goodreads
3 Stars
In book three of the Testing series, the United Commonwealth wants to eliminate the rebel alliance fighting to destroy The Testing for good. Cia is ready to lead the charge, but will her lethal classmates follow her into battle?

She wants to put an end to the Testing
In a scarred and brutal future, The United Commonwealth teeters on the brink of all-out civil war. The rebel resistance plots against a government that rules with cruelty and cunning. Gifted student and Testing survivor, Cia Vale, vows to fight.

But she can't do it alone.
This is the chance to lead that Cia has trained for - but who will follow? Plunging through layers of danger and deception, Cia must risk the lives of those she loves--and gamble on the loyalty of her lethal classmates.

Who can Cia trust?
The stakes are higher than ever-lives of promise cut short or fulfilled; a future ruled by fear or hope--in the electrifying conclusion to Joelle Charbonneau's epic Testing trilogy. Ready or not…it's Graduation Day.

The Final Test is the Deadliest!

Book Review:

When I finished THE TESTING, the first book in Joelle Charbonneau’s The Testing series, it was a book I thought about for days. I wanted to read it again, to relive every second of Cia’s Testing. I did, and enjoyed it just as much the second time. When I reviewed THE TESTING, I called it a “thinky version of THE HUNGER GAMES.” It was an almost perfect book for me.

At the time, I couldn’t see how the author would end the trilogy. I couldn’t wait to read GRADUATION DAY and find out what would happen to Cia and the United Commonwealth. But when I finally read the book, the magic just wasn’t there. GRADUATION DAY is an admirable conclusion, but for me, the author didn’t deliver on the big, exciting conclusion she promised with the setup in THE TESTING and INDEPENDENT STUDY.

In the beginning, there was a big twist that I really liked, but then Cia started spending an awful lot of time in her head. Now, I like that Cia tries to think things through, and doesn’t act on impulse unless she has no choice. But this time, Cia’s inner monologues lost me, and I often had to reread paragraphs to figure out where her thoughts were going. I was very close to bored at times.

The second half of GRADUATION DAY picked up with lots of action that was reminiscent of the first two books. I enjoyed that half more than the first, but the ending left me somewhat disappointed. So much setup for that ending, and then BAM, the book was over. There’s an insane amount of double crossing and wondering who to trust or believe, and at the end, I was a bit confused about what went down because it was so fast. I wish the author had spent more time explaining the after effects of the rebellion.

All in all, GRADUATION DAY wasn’t a totally disappointing conclusion, but it wasn’t amazing, either.

Socialize with the author:

Joelle Charbonneau:
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– leeanna

Book Review: Gates of Thread and Stone by Lori M. Lee

Book Review: Gates of Thread and Stone by Lori M. LeeGates of Thread and Stone by Lori M. Lee
Series: Gates of Thread and Stone #1
Published by Skyscape on August 5, 2014
Genres: Fantasy, Romance, Young Adult
Pages: 335
Format: eARC
Source: NetGalley
Goodreads
3 Stars
In the Labyrinth, we had a saying: keep silent, keep still, keep safe.

In a city of walls and secrets, where only one man is supposed to possess magic, seventeen-year-old Kai struggles to keep hidden her own secret—she can manipulate the threads of time. When Kai was eight, she was found by Reev on the riverbank, and her “brother” has taken care of her ever since. Kai doesn’t know where her ability comes from—or where she came from. All that matters is that she and Reev stay together, and maybe one day move out of the freight container they call home, away from the metal walls of the Labyrinth. Kai’s only friend is Avan, the shopkeeper’s son with the scandalous reputation that both frightens and intrigues her.

Then Reev disappears. When keeping silent and safe means losing him forever, Kai vows to do whatever it takes to find him. She will leave the only home she’s ever known and risk getting caught up in a revolution centuries in the making. But to save Reev, Kai must unravel the threads of her past and face shocking truths about her brother, her friendship with Avan, and her unique power.

Book Review:

There are two things I really liked about GATES OF THREAD AND STONE: the city of Ninurta and the strong relationship between Kai and Reev.

Ninurta has a dark, gritty, post-apocalyptic feel. It’s populated by humans who have survived a devastating war between magic users and the military. Most people struggle to survive, including Kai and Reev, who live in a freight container stacked in a labyrinth-like maze. They barely make enough credits to buy food, whereas wealthy people, who live in the walled off White Court, have money to blow on fancy clothing, fresh food, and even magically-powered transportation devices. Somewhat standard stuff, but I got a really good sense of the city, and the hardiness one needed to survive in the Labyrinth.

Kai and Reev are siblings by choice. He took her in when she was a child; Kai has no memories of her life before Reev found her. They support each other, and are working their way out of the Labyrinth and into a better area. When Reev goes missing — just another missing person in a string of unsolved disappearances — Kai will stop at nothing to save her big brother. If necessary, she’ll even use the ability Reev has told her never to use: her ability to manipulate the threads of time. I really liked Kai and Reev, because it’s not often you see such a sibling relationship, and one where they aren’t blood relatives. I like the theme of chosen family versus biological family in books, and that comes out to play in GATES OF THREAD AND STONE.

So, GATES OF THREAD AND STONE has a few things going for it. The beginning is a bit slow but good, since it develops the city of Ninurta, and Kai and Reev. But after Reev disappears, the book goes from “oh, this is pretty cool” to just “hmm” for me.

Kai teams up with Avan, her only real friend other than Reev, and they set off into the devastation outside Ninurta to rescue Reev. They have somewhat of a romance, and I did appreciate that Kai would keep reminding herself she should focus on saving her brother rather than flirting with Avan. I could see why Kai liked Avan, but I’m not entirely sure why Avan liked Kai. The romance — I could have taken or left it, especially with the ending.

Oh, the middle and ending. That’s where my ambivalence for GATES OF THREAD AND STONE comes in. The middle is somewhat a waste of time. Rather than learn how to better use her time manipulation ability, Kai’s told not to use it. Instead … she learns to kick and punch. Bah. The ending of the book felt like a rush, with the author dropping revelation after revelation. There were a lot of them in the last few chapters, and I needed to reread the rush of information so I could piece everything together.

Overall, GATES OF THREAD AND STONE was a mixed book for me. I liked some parts and didn’t like others, but I’m pretty sure I would continue this series. I don’t want to spoil everything, but I did like the mythology of the Immortals (read and find out!), and I’m curious to see what will happen next.

Socialize with the author:

Lori M. Lee:
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– leeanna

Book Review: Visions by Larkin Rose

Book Review: Visions by Larkin RoseVisions by Larkin Rose
Published by Bold Strokes Books on June 17, 2014
Genres: Adult, Erotica, LGBT, Romance
Pages: 264
Format: eARC
Source: NetGalley
Goodreads
3 Stars
Paige Burton meets the love of her sexual life at a masked sex party when she’s too young to realize how special their connection is. After years of searching for similar sexual bliss, she has officially given up. Now she pours out her frustration via her online blog and by dancing away her frustrations in her club.

Billionaire architect Mayson Montgomery made her fortune building eco-friendly offshore wind turbines. She learned quickly that money stood in the way of finding a happy ever after. But she still remembers her masked angel years ago.

When they meet again, Paige doesn’t make the connection between her masked lover from the past and Galveston’s raunchy rich heart throb. Fortunately, Mayson is a little more aware and won’t give up until Paige has fallen head over heels for her.

Will Paige and Mayson grasp the love in front of them or will they let it slip away a second time?

Book Review:

VISIONS started off a bit rocky for me. The two main characters, Paige and Mayson, meet up at a masked sex party and jump into bed with each other within pages. Yes, I do know the summary promised that, but I didn’t expect it at the very start of the book!

But once I got further into VISIONS, the beginning made a lot of sense. Ever since Paige had that mindblowing sex at the masquerade, she’s been searching for more. But her search has been downright disappointing, and so she’s become a connoisseur of sex toys, even writing a review blog. Mayson has put her love life on the backburner, content to provide humanitarian relief for disaster stricken areas. When the two meet again — by coincidence and face to face — neither knows who the other is, and sparks fly. Paige can’t stand Mayson, but once Mayson figures out Paige is the one from the masquerade, she’s determined to win her over.

There’s a lot of steamy sex in VISIONS. It’s in the first chapter, and then throughout the book. There’s the Mayson/Paige friction/chemistry, which was fun to read, and also the Vinden/Paige adventures, wherein a masked mystery woman seduces Paige and gives her incredible orgasms. I hate to say it, but there was a bit too much sex for me in VISIONS. The different sex scenes were fun at first, but they got somewhat repetitive.

I thought VISIONS was pretty good. Perfect for the beach or an afternoon of escapism. Paige and Mayson were both strong women who knew what they wanted and were determined to get it. I did wonder why Paige was so focused on finding someone for great sex and great sex alone.

Socialize with the author:

Larkin Rose:
Website

– leeanna

Book Review: Breaking the Reins (Breaking #1) by Juliana Haygert

Book Review: Breaking the Reins (Breaking #1) by Juliana HaygertBreaking the Reins by Juliana Haygert
Series: Breaking #1
Published by Self-Published on August 14, 2013
Genres: Contemporary, New Adult, Romance
Pages: 401
Format: eBook
Source: Author
Goodreads
3 Stars
Horses, mansions, tea parties, and lies are twenty-year-old Hannah Taylor’s life. To others, her family and her relationship with Eric is perfect. But she knows the truth. She lives it.

After a fire takes her grandma's life and kills her horse, Hannah's immaculate life spirals out of control. Her father disapproves of her decision to run her grandma’s ranch instead of focusing solely on learning the family business; Animal Control brings her Argus, a mistreated horse that she can't turn away even though she's not ready for another horse; and her boyfriend, Eric Bennett, a world famous polo player, becomes possessive and authoritarian. Despite her best efforts to disguise it, Hannah grows wary of him.

Then, Leonardo Fernandes struts onto the polo scene. A cocky rookie with a messy life of his own, he’s drawn to Hannah and isn’t afraid of showing it, even when Eric makes it clear she is his and he’ll do whatever it takes to keep it that way. Hannah suffers for Eric’s jealousy. The abuse only gets worse when Leo steals the title of best polo player in the world from Eric.

But the title isn’t enough for Leo. He wants Hannah too, and she can’t deny her attraction to him either. Somehow, she must find a way to break free from abusive Eric before he breaks every bone in her body.

Book Review:

BREAKING THE REINS was quite difficult to read at times, due to the main character being in an abusive relationship. Now, I did like that the author explored being in an abusive relationship, and the possible thoughts/excuses one might make, but I thought she went a little too far with the boyfriend’s behavior. But more about that later.

BREAKING THE REINS is an apt title for this book, as there are three characters who are struggling. Hannah’s stuck in a few ways: she’s inherited her grandmother’s ranch, a property her father and boyfriend want her to sell; she’s in that abusive relationship with boyfriend Eric; and she’s trying to rehabilitate an abused horse. Argus, the abused horse, is scared of people, but unless he makes some progress, he’s likely to be put down. And Leo, a super hot Brazilian polo player, wants to be Hannah’s rescuer, but he’s hiding some big secrets which could come between them.

I mostly liked this book. The horse bits weren’t 100% accurate, which was a disappointment, but I got so into Hannah’s story that I was able to mostly overlook that. I got so into Hannah’s story because for a lot of the book, it was realistic to me. I knew something was off about Eric almost immediately, and it’s never easy for me to read about a character that can’t see it, or tries to rationalize what’s going on. Did I want Hannah to stand up to Eric and leave him, especially once he started hitting her? Hell yes. Did I understand the excuses she made to herself to stay with him? Hell yes.

It’s impossible for me to explain why I thought Eric was a bit too out there without spoiling a majority of the book. So I’ll settle for saying that I think the author tried to make him too horrific, too over the top. Even before Eric was too much, he made my stomach turn, so I really wish she hadn’t gone as far as she did, because some of the things Eric supposedly did were just unbelievable. That affected my thoughts for the book as a whole, taking it down a star for me.

I do think BREAKING THE REINS is a good introduction to Juliana Haygert’s work, and I would read more of her books.

Socialize with the author:

Juliana Haygert:
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– leeanna

Book Review: The Queen of the Tearling (The Queen of the Tearling #1) by Erika Johansen

Book Review: The Queen of the Tearling (The Queen of the Tearling #1) by Erika JohansenThe Queen of the Tearling by Erika Johansen
Series: The Queen of the Tearling #1
Published by Harper on July 8, 2014
Genres: Fantasy, New Adult
Pages: 448
Format: ARC
Source: Amazon Vine, Edelweiss
Goodreads
3 Stars
On her nineteenth birthday, Princess Kelsea Raleigh Glynn, raised in exile, sets out on a perilous journey back to the castle of her birth to ascend her rightful throne. Plain and serious, a girl who loves books and learning, Kelsea bears little resemblance to her mother, the vain and frivolous Queen Elyssa. But though she may be inexperienced and sheltered, Kelsea is not defenseless: Around her neck hangs the Tearling sapphire, a jewel of immense magical power; and accompanying her is the Queen’s Guard, a cadre of brave knights led by the enigmatic and dedicated Lazarus. Kelsea will need them all to survive a cabal of enemies who will use every weapon—from crimson-caped assassins to the darkest blood magic—to prevent her from wearing the crown.

Despite her royal blood, Kelsea feels like nothing so much as an insecure girl, a child called upon to lead a people and a kingdom about which she knows almost nothing. But what she discovers in the capital will change everything, confronting her with horrors she never imagined. An act of singular daring will throw Kelsea’s kingdom into tumult, unleashing the vengeance of the tyrannical ruler of neighboring Mortmesne: the Red Queen, a sorceress possessed of the darkest magic. Now Kelsea will begin to discover whom among the servants, aristocracy, and her own guard she can trust.

But the quest to save her kingdom and meet her destiny has only just begun—a wondrous journey of self-discovery and a trial by fire that will make her a legend…if she can survive.

Book Review:

THE QUEEN OF THE TEARLING is a book with a lot of hype behind it. The film rights have already been sold, and supposedly Emma Watson is “attached to star” (whatever that means). Books with so much hype behind them usually fail for me. THE QUEEN OF THE TEARLING is an okay fantasy — it’s not great, it’s not horrible. It’s somewhere in the middle. A very long middle.

I’ll address the length of this book first: it’s over 400 pages. I swear it’s 200 pages too long. Now, don’t get me wrong — I read a lot of epic fantasy. Books that I could use as bricks. Books that have 800 or 900 pages, and I want another 800 or 900 pages because I love the characters and the world. Not so with THE QUEEN OF THE TEARLING. There are a lot of boring bits that I wanted to skim, parts that could have been pared down or left out altogether. There’s an abundance of detail, describing what Kelsea has for dinner or what a building looks like.

Too much detail, and not enough worldbuilding, because I was super confused on how the Tearling and other countries came to be. At first, it seems like a standard European-based medieval fantasy, but then there’s a mention of the Harry Potter series. The Tearling supposedly started as a utopia, but somehow it’s now a medieval world complete with serfdom and slaves. There are vague mentions of “The Crossing,” which I guess is when Americans crossed into the Tearling, but it’s not given enough explanation. And, oh yeah, all the doctors were on the same boat, so when that boat sank, so did all medical knowledge. Riiiiight. The more I think about the world in this book, the more confused I get.

I could say more critical stuff about this book, but … even with the multiple issues I had (beyond length and worldbuilding), I actually did get into THE QUEEN OF THE TEARLING. It’s not a memorable book, but the author did rouse my curiosity enough for me to want to see what happens next. I just hope the follow-up makes more sense and isn’t as wordy.

So, in conclusion: an average fantasy.

– leeanna

Book Review: The Forever Song (Blood of Eden #3) by Julie Kagawa

Book Review: The Forever Song (Blood of Eden #3) by Julie KagawaThe Forever Song by Julie Kagawa
Series: Blood of Eden #3
Published by Harlequin Teen on April 15, 2014
Genres: Dystopian, Paranormal, Romance, Young Adult
Pages: 393
Format: eARC
Source: Amazon Vine, NetGalley
Goodreads
3 Stars
Vengeance will be hers.

Allison Sekemoto once struggled with the question: human or monster? With the death of her love, Zeke, she has her answer.

Monster.

Allie will embrace her cold vampire side to hunt down and end Sarren, the psychopathic vampire who murdered Zeke. But the trail is bloody and long, and Sarren has left many surprises for Allie and her companions - her creator Kanin, and her blood brother, Jackal. The trail is leading straight to the one place they must protect at any cost - the last vampire-free zone on Earth, Eden. And Sarren has one final, brutal shock in store for Allie.

In a ruined world where no life is sacred and former allies can turn on you in one heartbeat, Allie will face her darkest days. And if she succeeds, her triumph will be short-lived in the face of surviving forever alone.

THE FINAL HUNT IS ON.

Book Review:

Over the past few years I’ve been reviewing books, I’ve noticed a pattern: I usually don’t read the last book of a trilogy. I almost wish I hadn’t read THE FOREVER SONG, because it just wasn’t the best end to the series. I feel like I could have stopped with book two, THE ETERNITY CURE, as THE FOREVER SONG was mostly unnecessary. You can predict how the series will end, and the journey to the ending is rather boring at times.

At 393 pages, I swear the book could have been cut in half and told the same story, since so much of it was repetition: tons of travel, tons of rabid attacks, and tons of angst from Allie and Zeke. As with THE ETERNITY CURE, Jackal was the highlight of THE FOREVER SONG for me. I could quote line after line of his dialogue; he’s a perfect combination of dry wit, sarcasm, and unabashed vampireness. Unlike Allie, who is still adjusting to the fact that she’s a vampire and has to drink blood to survive, Jackal would paint a town red. Not in a crazy way like psychotic Sarren, but just because he would enjoy it.

Here’s an example, one of many I bookmarked:

“‘There you go again.’ Jackal sighed from the front. ‘Getting the puppy’s hopes up. More likely, every bloodbag in Eden is screaming and tearing their faces off, but oh, no, no one wants to hear that.’ He waved a hand. ‘So, go ahead, tell him that everything is going to be fine. All the meatsacks are perfectly content on their happy little island, Sarren has given up world destruction to raise kittens, and the magic wish fairy will wave her wand and turn shit into gold.’ (page 235).”

Don’t you just love Jackal? I do!

For the climactic book of a series, I guess I expected more than Allie and Zeke spending most of the book angsting over their vampire lives. The cure was almost stupidly simple, and it seems to me it’s something where the journey is more important than the end product type of things. But I just wish that journey hadn’t included so much traveling and repetition. One of the things that really captured my interest in this series was the bleak, dark, dystopian society Julie Kagawa created. One where vampires were the absolute power, and humans spent all of their time trying to find enough food to eat. I wanted to see more of that, or at least more of Eden, but no. It really felt like 97% of the book was spent on the long, dull road.

In the end, I’m just meh on THE FOREVER SONG. For me, it didn’t live up to the first two books in the series. It’s not a bad conclusion, but it was just missing something for me to feel really good about the end of the series.

Socialize with the author:
Julie Kagawa:
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– leeanna

Book Review: Unwrapped Sky (Caeli-Amur #1) by Rjurik Davidson

Book Review: Unwrapped Sky (Caeli-Amur #1) by Rjurik DavidsonUnwrapped Sky by Rjurik Davidson
Series: Caeli-Amur #1
Published by Tor on April 15, 2014
Genres: Fantasy
Pages: 430
Format: eARC
Source: NetGalley
Goodreads
3 Stars
Caeli-Amur: an ancient city perched on white cliffs overlooking the sea; a city ruled by three Houses, fighting internecine wars; a city which harbours ancient technology and hidden mysteries. But things are changing in Caeli-Amur. Ancient minotaurs arrive for the traditional Festival of the Sun. The slightly built New-Men bring their technology from their homeland. Wastelanders stream into the city hideously changed by the chemical streams to the north. Strikes break out in the factory district.

In a hideout beneath the city, a small group of seditionists debate ways to overthrow the Houses. How can they rouse the citizens of the city? Should they begin a campaign of terror? Is there a way to uncover the thaumaturgical knowledge that the Houses guard so jealously? As the Houses scramble to maintain their rule, it becomes clear that things will change forever in Caeli-Amur.

Book Review:

I really thought UNWRAPPED SKY was going to be about minotaurs. Given that there’s a minotaur on the cover, and they’re mentioned in the summary, I figured that was a safe assumption. Unfortunately, they play a small role in what I’d call a philosophical fantasy.

UNWRAPPED SKY took me two attempts to read. The first time I wasn’t expecting such a serious book, so I had trouble getting into it and ended up restarting the book about a month after I first picked it up. The second time I knew what to expect, and had an easier time, although I did end up skimming some of the passages dealing with the different philosophies. The seditionists who wanted to overthrow the House system were a bit too thinky for me at times, but then, I tend to prefer physical action to mental.

The book is told from the perspective of three different characters, each in a different place in society in Caeli-Amur. Kata is a philosopher-assassin, an orphan trained to be useful in the debt of House Technis. Boris, a former tramworker, has risen higher than his fellows in the service of House Technis. Maximilian is a seditionist, devoted to overthrowing the House system. In Caeli-Amur, three Houses control the city, much like a feudal lord controlling his lands.

Honestly, the political aspects of UNWRAPPED SKY didn’t interest me all that much. There’s a lot of buildup and debating about power, human nature — that type of thing. None of the characters in the book are particularly good, but there’s something to sympathize about for each of them. As I said before, I sometimes skimmed when the characters got too cerebral, too into discussing how to change things or why the system worked (depending on the perspective). But something always came along that re-hooked my interest and made me keep reading.

I read fantasy for escapism, to lose myself in new worlds. In that aspect, the book was fascinating. I really enjoyed the world, which had fantasy and steampunk elements, as well as an interesting mythology. The idea of philosopher assassins? Super cool. I also liked the author’s writing style, which was quite descriptive without being purple prose. I felt like I was in Caeli-Amur watching everything unfold.

Although I didn’t love UNWRAPPED SKY, I would continue the series, as I enjoyed the world and am curious about what will come next for everyone. Book two, THE STARS ASKEW, will be published in 2015.

Socialize with the author:

Rjurik Davidson:
Website

– leeanna