Book Review: All We Have Is Now by Lisa Schroeder

Book Review: All We Have Is Now by Lisa SchroederAll We Have Is Now by Lisa Schroeder
Published by Scholastic on July 28, 2015
Genres: Contemporary, Romance, Science Fiction, Young Adult
Pages: 272
Source: Blog Tour, Publisher
Goodreads
4 Stars
What do you do with your last day on earth?

Just over twenty-four hours are left until an asteroid strikes North America, and for Emerson and everyone else who didn't leave, the world will end. But Emerson's world already ended when she ran away from home. Since then, she has lived on the streets, relying on her wits and on her friend Vince to help her find places to sleep and food to eat.

The city's quieter now that most people are gone, and no one seems to know what to do as the end approaches. But then Emerson and Vince meet Carl, who tells them he has been granting people's wishes -- and gives them his wallet full of money.

Suddenly, this last day seems full of possibility. Emerson and Vince can grant a lot of wishes in one last day -- maybe even their own.

all we have is now by lisa schroeder blog tour

Welcome to my stop on the blog tour for ALL WE HAVE IS NOW by Lisa Schroeder. This tour is hosted by CBB Book Promotions and you can visit all the stops here. After my review, there’s a tour-wide giveaway, and also my answer for Make-A-Wish-for-the-Apocalypse.

Book Review:

ALL WE HAVE IS NOW asks one important question: what would you do with your last day on earth? What if you knew an asteroid was going to wipe out North America — would you spend your last day with loved ones, righting wrongs, or hiding? Or would you do something else?

Emerson and Vince, two homeless teenagers, don’t want to wait the last few hours until the end. They’re about to take their end into their own hands when they meet Carl, who has spent his time granting wishes to people. Helping them do something they’d always wanted to, but hadn’t for one reason or another. Carl grants Vince’s wish of having money, and asks that the two pay it forward if possible.

Emerson and Vince have been concerned with surviving on the streets for so long that they’ve forgotten how to really live, how to enjoy themselves. But as they grant wishes and help people, their own wounds start to heal. ALL WE HAVE IS NOW is a hopeful story about the end of the world, one that shows how important human connections can be at the end. I like that the book tries to remind the reader that it’s important to live in the moment and enjoy yourself, rather than always looking to the future.

ALL WE HAVE IS NOW also follows Carl, and I liked that while the book is young adult, we also get the perspective of an adult. It was good to see how he felt about events compared to how Emerson and Vince felt. I was a little let down by the ending, which was too open for me, but overall I liked the message and tone of the book. I think it’s hard for a book about the impending end of North America to be uplifting, but the author accomplished it.

Make-A-Wish-for-the-Apocalypse

Make-A-Wish-for-the-Apocalypse- There’s just a little over 24 hours until a meteor is scheduled to hit the US. What do you wish for?

Okay, so I wish I could say I’d go out and do something like Emerson and Vince. Or that I’d grant some wish of my own, of things I’ve always wanted to do but never did. But in reality? I’d probably just stay in my house all day. Maybe read some of those books on my TBR pile that I’ve always wanted to read, but haven’t. Or maybe I’d read old favorites, so I’d be assured of enjoying a good book before the end. Or maybe I’d take a nap so I wouldn’t have to count down the hours. Yeah, I’m exciting, aren’t I?

Giveaway:

a Rafflecopter giveaway

About the author:

all we have is now author lisa schroederLisa Schroeder is the author of over a dozen books for kids and teens, including the YA novels I Heart You, You Haunt Me and The Bridge From Me to You. She loves tea and cookies, flowers, family hikes, books and movies that make her laugh and cry, and sunshine. Living in Oregon, she doesn’t get nearly enough sunshine, but the hikes are amazing.

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Buy links: Amazon | B&N

– leeanna

Book Review: Star Wars: Dark Disciple by Christie Golden

Book Review: Star Wars: Dark Disciple by Christie GoldenDark Disciple by Christie Golden
Series: Star Wars
Published by LucasBooks on July 7, 2015
Genres: Science Fiction
Pages: 336
Format: eARC
Source: NetGalley
Goodreads
3 Stars
Based on unproduced scripts from the blockbuster TV show Star Wars: The Clone Wars!

The only way to bring down the dark side's most dangerous warrior may be for Jedi and Sith to join forces.

In the war for control of the galaxy between the armies of the dark side and the Republic, former Jedi Master turned ruthless Sith Lord Count Dooku has grown ever more brutal in his tactics. Despite the powers of the Jedi and the military prowess of their clone army, the sheer number of fatalities is taking a terrible toll. And when Dooku orders the massacre of a flotilla of helpless refugees, the Jedi Council feels it has no choice but to take drastic action: targeting the man responsible for so many war atrocities, Count Dooku himself.

But the ever-elusive Dooku is dangerous prey for even the most skilled hunter. So the Council makes the bold decision to bring both sides of the Force's power to bear—pairing brash Jedi Knight Quinlan Vos with infamous one-time Sith acolyte Asajj Ventress. Though Jedi distrust for the cunning killer who once served at Dooku's side still runs deep, Ventress's hatred for her former master runs deeper. She's more than willing to lend her copious talents as a bounty hunter—and assassin—to Vos's quest.

Together, Ventress and Vos are the best hope for eliminating Dooku—as long as the emerging feelings between them don't compromise their mission. But Ventress is determined to have her retribution and at last let go of her dark Sith past. Balancing the complicated emotions she feels for Vos with the fury of her warrior's spirit, she resolves to claim victory on all fronts—a vow that will be mercilessly tested by her deadly enemy . . . and her own doubt.

Book Review:

I’ve been a fan of the Star Wars Expanded Universe books for years, but I never got into the comics or Star Wars: The Clone Wars. So I didn’t have a lot of knowledge on Asajj Ventress or Quinlan Vos that I had to ignore, now that the EU is considered “Legends.” After finishing DARK DISCIPLE, I did go to Wookiepedia and read about both characters; if you are a huge fan of either, be prepared. There’s some definite changes.

DARK DISCIPLE was a mixed bag for me. I think Golden does a good job of developing Ventress and Vos and growing the relationship between them. The author also explores the consequences of the Jedi sending Vos on a mission to assassinate Count Dooku — is preserving one life worth the millions he’s killed? Lastly, I liked that Ventress shows Vos how there’s more than one aspect to the Dark Side.

But by the middle and especially the end, DARK DISCIPLE started slowing down for me. The characters flip flop allegiances without a lot of explanation, and the book drags. Ventress faded into the background, which I didn’t like. She’s the kind of character — morally ambiguous, flawed, powerful — that I want to see more of. I feel like Vos got way more page time, which I didn’t enjoy, since some of the important stuff that happened with him we didn’t get to see. I hate being told about important events — I want to read them for myself!

I really did not like the ending. I can’t say why, because that would be a huge spoiler, but it verged into a bad trope. I’m not sure if the ending was decided by the author, or written in the unproduced scripts the book is based on.

Socialize with the author:

Christie Golden:
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– leeanna

Book Review: Lords of the Sith by Paul S. Kemp

Book Review: Lords of the Sith by Paul S. KempLords of the Sith by Paul S. Kemp
Series: Star Wars
Published by Del Rey on April 28, 2015
Genres: Science Fiction
Pages: 320
Format: eARC
Source: NetGalley
Goodreads
4 Stars
A long time ago in a galaxy far, far away. . . .

When the Emperor and his notorious apprentice, Darth Vader, find themselves stranded in the middle of insurgent action on an inhospitable planet, they must rely on each other, the Force, and their own ruthlessness to prevail.

“It appears things are as you suspected, Lord Vader. We are indeed hunted.”

Anakin Skywalker, Jedi Knight, is just a memory. Darth Vader, newly anointed Sith Lord, is ascendant. The Emperor’s chosen apprentice has swiftly proven his loyalty to the dark side. Still, the history of the Sith Order is one of duplicity, betrayal, and acolytes violently usurping their Masters—and the truest measure of Vader’s allegiance has yet to be taken. Until now.

On Ryloth, a planet crucial to the growing Empire as a source of slave labor and the narcotic known as “spice,” an aggressive resistance movement has arisen, led by Cham Syndulla, an idealistic freedom fighter, and Isval, a vengeful former slave. But Emperor Palpatine means to control the embattled world and its precious resources—by political power or firepower—and he will be neither intimidated nor denied. Accompanied by his merciless disciple, Darth Vader, he sets out on a rare personal mission to ensure his will is done.

For Syndulla and Isval, it’s the opportunity to strike at the very heart of the ruthless dictatorship sweeping the galaxy. And for the Emperor and Darth Vader, Ryloth becomes more than just a matter of putting down an insurrection: When an ambush sends them crashing to the planet’s surface, where inhospitable terrain and an army of resistance fighters await them, they will find their relationship tested as never before. With only their lightsabers, the dark side of the Force, and each other to depend on, the two Sith must decide if the brutal bond they share will make them victorious allies or lethal adversaries.

Book Review:

Paul S. Kemp is one of my favorite authors, so when I saw he had another Star Wars book in the works, I couldn’t wait to read it. LORDS OF THE SITH is the best Star Wars book I’ve read in at least a year. If you like Darth Vader and Emperor Palpatine being the badasses they are, you’ve got to check this out.

Eight years after the Clone Wars, most of the galaxy is used to Imperial rule. But on Ryloth, Cham Syndulla leads the Free Ryloth movement. He’s a freedom fighter, determined to free his planet from Imperial tyranny. When he gets word that Darth Vader and Emperor Palpatine are coming to Ryloth to punish the planet’s Moff, he sees it as the chance of a lifetime. It’s the best opportunity they’ll ever have to free Ryloth and its citizens. But will Vader and Palpatine fall to Free Ryloth’s well-laid plans? Or are they playing an even deeper game?

Paul S. Kemp is such a skillful writer at creating tension and plot twists, that, for a while, I thought the Twi’leks would succeed. Do they? Maybe. There’s a good level of action in LORDS OF THE SITH. Events keep building and building until you think there’s nothing else that can happen, but then WHAM! There’s more. There are also some great action scenes, lots of lightsaber fun and Force-assisted fighting.

I also liked that the author brought up Vader’s past. I can’t recall seeing this very often, if at all, in other books. It was nice to see Vader remember life as Anakin. To see what he feels about his past, and to see how it now influences him. There’s also some … I’ll call it dark side bonding, between Vader and Palpatine, a look into their roles as Master and Apprentice, and how the roles impact their behavior and actions.

The Free Ryloth movement was interesting, as well. While I generally prefer Imperials and Sith, I do like seeing the other side. Imperial control of the planet has pushed Cham to better Ryloth and its people. But for Isval, it’s a quest for vengeance, with the side benefit of helping her people. It was fun reading to watch the Twi’leks maneuver and confuse the Imperials.

Lastly, LORDS OF THE SITH made news when it was announced the book would have a lesbian character. I’m a big fan of diversity and am always looking for it, so that only made me more excited. I think it was a long time coming — in a universe as big as Star Wars, it stands to reason that not all characters are heterosexual. But I’m mentioning this in my review to say that it’s not like the Moff is having sex on every page, or making a big deal out of her sexuality. It’s just part of who she is, which is how it should be. End soapbox.

Overall, LORDS OF THE SITH is a fantastic Star Wars book. It’s restored my faith in the series after a couple of subpar volumes.

Let’s talk about it:

Rebel Alliance or the Galactic Empire?

Socialize with the author:

Paul S. Kemp:
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– leeanna

Book Review: Dove Arising by Karen Bao

Book Review: Dove Arising by Karen BaoDove Arising by Karen Bao
Series: Dove Chronicles #1
Published by Viking Books for Young Readers on February 24, 2015
Genres: Dystopian, Post-Apocalyptic, Science Fiction, Young Adult
Pages: 336
Format: ARC
Source: Amazon Vine
Goodreads
2 Stars
Phaet Theta has lived her whole life in a colony on the Moon. She’s barely spoken since her father died in an accident nine years ago. She cultivates the plants in Greenhouse 22, lets her best friend talk for her, and stays off the government’s radar.

Then her mother is arrested.

The only way to save her younger siblings from the degrading Shelter is by enlisting in the Militia, the faceless army that polices the Lunar bases and protects them from attacks by desperate Earth dwellers. Training is brutal, but it’s where Phaet forms an uneasy but meaningful alliance with the preternaturally accomplished Wes, a fellow outsider.

Rank high, save her siblings, free her mom: that’s the plan. Until Phaet’s logically ordered world begins to crumble...

Suspenseful, intelligent, and hauntingly prescient, Dove Arising stands on the shoulders of our greatest tales of the future to tell a story that is all too relevant today.

Book Review:

DOVE ARISING is the first book in Karen Bao’s sci-fi/dystopian YA series, the Dove Chronicles. Phaet dreams of being a Bioengineer, to create something new. But when her mother is taken away, first to medical quarantine and then to jail, Phaet gives up her dreams and joins the Militia early. It’s the only way she can earn enough money to support her siblings, pay the bills, and pay her mother’s bail. But Phaet’s only fifteen — three years younger than everyone else and she has to rank first to get the needed money.

I was originally excited about DOVE ARISING because I thought, “Woot, YA sci-fi! A book set on the moon, awesome.” But while the book is set on the moon, the setting doesn’t really make that much impact, and the book focuses much more on its dystopian aspects. I do appreciate that the author described Phaet’s military training, because training can often be glossed over in books like this. But I found it unrealistic that she became a military genius in two months, able to outrun, outthink, and outdo trainees who had three years on her. And while I did like seeing the training described, I think it took over too much of the book. It reminded me of THE HUNGER GAMES or ENDER’S GAME, but without the same … oomph as those books.

DOVE ARISING did entertain me while I was reading, but then when I thought about it after, my opinion started going down. There’s a lot of the usual YA cliches, including the corrupt government, family secrets, and even a love triangle. Romance doesn’t play a huge part in this first book of the trilogy, but I can see how the author’s setting it up and ugh, it’s unnecessary. Plus there’s a character who lies a lot, and Phaet thinks, “Oh, it’s okay that he lied to me. He saved my life, so I’ll trust him.” The book makes her out to be smarter than that, but nope.

And then this bugged me: the characters all have handscreens. Think a cellphone screen implanted on your left hand, one that gives you the statistics of everyone you meet. The Committee supposedly uses the handscreens as a way to Big Brother citizens, but … sitting on your left hand can block them from listening. Really? Something so absurd kept pulling me out of the narrative anytime the characters would sit on or hide their left hand when they didn’t want a conversation to be recorded.

Socialize with the author:

Karen Bao:
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– leeanna

Book Review: I Heart Robot by Suzanne van Rooyen

Book Review: I Heart Robot by Suzanne van RooyenI Heart Robot by Suzanne van Rooyen
Published by Month9Books on March 31, 2015
Genres: Romance, Science Fiction, Young Adult
Pages: 304
Format: eARC
Source: Publisher
Goodreads
4 Stars
Sixteen-year-old Tyri wants to be a musician and wants to be with someone who won't belittle her musical aspirations.

Q-I-99 aka 'Quinn' lives in a scrap metal sanctuary with other rogue droids. While some use violence to make their voices heard, demanding equal rights for AI enhanced robots, Quinn just wants a moment on stage with his violin to show the humans that androids like him have more to offer than their processing power.

Tyri and Quinn's worlds collide when they're accepted by the Baldur Junior Philharmonic Orchestra. As the rift between robots and humans deepens, Tyri and Quinn's love of music brings them closer together, making Tyri question where her loyalties lie and Quinn question his place in the world. With the city on the brink of civil war, Tyri and Quinn make a shocking discovery that turns their world inside out. Will their passion for music be enough to hold them together while everything else crumbles down around them, or will the truth of who they are tear them apart?

Book Review:

Set in a future where most humans think robots shouldn’t have rights, and robots think they should, I HEART ROBOT asks what it means to be human. Is being human necessary to create? Can robots think, create, love? If they can, should they be destroyed, or should they be allowed to flourish? Are artificially intelligent robots a threat to humanity, or is humanity a threat to those robots?

Tyri wants to be a musician. But everyone around her, including her mother and boyfriend, think she should do something useful to society, like politics or science. Quinn, a companion android who escaped abusive owners, wants to play music and show that he’s human, not just a robot without feelings. When they’re caught up in the increasingly violent rift between humans and robots, they question their beliefs and their roles.

At first, I thought I HEART ROBOT was going to be a girl/android love story, and while yeah, there’s a bit of that, there’s also a lot more. The author asks the same questions I did at the start of this review, showing a variety of answers from pro and anti robot characters. I really got into I HEART ROBOT, and read it in one sitting. The book isn’t too long, but it’s one that left me thinking. I really hope there’s a sequel, because the ending is open and leaves some questions unresolved. I want to know what happens next to Tyri and Quinn.

I HEART ROBOT YA science fiction, but it’s not packed with technical mumbo jumbo that pulls you out of the book. There’s also some diversity in the book, which I was happy to see. Tyri’s best friend has a girlfriend, and the book is set in Skandia, a post-war combination of Sweden and Norway. I would have liked some more worldbuilding and scene setting, so that I truly felt like I was overseas. Lastly, I liked that Tyri questioned her romantic relationships, speaking up for herself when necessary, but also acting like a teen in love at the same time.

Let’s talk about it:

Do you think androids deserve equal rights?

Socialize with the author:

Suzanne van Rooyen:
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– leeanna

Book Review: Rush (The Game #1) by Eve Silver

Book Review: Rush (The Game #1) by Eve SilverRush by Eve Silver
Series: The Game #1
Published by Katherine Tegen Books on June 11, 2013
Genres: Romance, Science Fiction, Young Adult
Pages: 361
Format: Paperback
Source: Author
Goodreads
3 Stars
So what’s the game now? This, or the life I used to know?

When Miki Jones is pulled from her life, pulled through time and space into some kind of game—her carefully controlled life spirals into chaos. In the game, she and a team of other teens are sent on missions to eliminate the Drau, terrifying and beautiful alien creatures. There are no practice runs, no training, and no way out. Miki has only the guidance of secretive but maddeningly attractive team leader Jackson Tate, who says the game isn’t really a game, that what Miki and her new teammates do now determines their survival, and the survival of every other person on this planet. She laughs. He doesn’t. And then the game takes a deadly and terrifying turn.

Book Review:

The idea behind RUSH is one I really like: teenagers pulled into a game to fight aliens. The book had me at “game” and “aliens.” I enjoyed that part of RUSH, and looked forward to every time Miki was pulled so I could learn more about the game and the aliens.

But RUSH also has two big reeding peeves of mine: a jerkish love interest and withholding information from the main character. So that factored into my enjoyment of the book. I didn’t love RUSH, I didn’t hate RUSH. It was okay. But that’s not really a bad thing, since RUSH did pique my interest enough for me to pick up book two, PUSH.

When Miki tries to save a deaf girl from being hit by a car, she’s the one that’s hit. Instead of dying, she wakes up in the game. Within minutes, she’s given a weapon and told not to let her life monitor turn red. Then she and the others are off to fight aliens. Not the green kind, but nasty ones who eat brains like chocolate and want to destroy Earth. The game is deadly, but it’s the first time Miki’s felt alive since her mother’s death.

Desperate for answers, Miki turns to her team’s leader, Jackson. But Jackson insists it’s every man for himself, and there is no team. He also has an incredibly infuriating habit of not answering Miki’s questions. I really, really dislike this tactic, especially when I don’t know anything and I spend my time being confused. For the majority of the book, Miki was confused too, which led to a lot of inner monologuing and questioning, which bogged down the action.

Then we get to the other problem I had with RUSH. Despite Jackson’s every man for himself attitude, he likes Miki for some reason. He even saves her life. And even though Jackson tries to push her away, even telling her he’s not a good guy and doesn’t have good intentions, Miki falls for him. She could be a minute from fighting, but she’ll notice some appealing feature of Jackson’s. I guess the author was trying to go for a love-hate relationship, but Jackson just came off as a jerk and I didn’t buy Miki’s interest in him. Now I’m quite critical of relationships, especially in YA, so you might vary.

The time in the game? Fantastic. My favorite parts of RUSH for sure. The author wrote some great action scenes, and had some really cool/creepy ideas on aliens. I like the idea of alien fighting being framed in a game, a way to get the players motivated and moving.

Socialize with the author:

Eve Silver:
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– leeanna

Book Review: Star Wars: Tarkin by James Luceno

Book Review: Star Wars: Tarkin by James LucenoTarkin by James Luceno
Series: Star Wars
Published by Del Rey on November 4, 2014
Genres: Science Fiction
Pages: 288
Format: eARC
Source: NetGalley
Goodreads
2 Stars
A long time ago in a galaxy far, far away....

Bestselling Star Wars veteran James Luceno gives Grand Moff Tarkin the Star Wars: Darth Plagueis treatment, bringing a legendary character from A New Hope to full, fascinating life.

He’s the scion of an honorable and revered family. A dedicated soldier and distinguished legislator. Loyal proponent of the Republic and trusted ally of the Jedi Order. Groomed by the ruthless politician and Sith Lord who would be Emperor, Governor Wilhuff Tarkin rises through the Imperial ranks, enforcing his authority ever more mercilessly ... and zealously pursuing his destiny as the architect of absolute dominion.

Rule through the fear of force rather than force itself, he advises his Emperor. Under Tarkin’s guidance, an ultimate weapon of unparalleled destruction moves ever closer to becoming a terrifying reality. When the so-called Death Star is completed, Tarkin is confident that the galaxy’s lingering pockets of Separatist rebellion will be brought to heel—by intimidation ... or annihilation.

Until then, however, insurgency remains a genuine threat. Escalating guerrilla attacks by resistance forces and newfound evidence of a growing Separatist conspiracy are an immediate danger the Empire must meet with swift and brutal action. And to bring down a band of elusive freedom fighters, the Emperor turns to his most formidable agents: Darth Vader, the fearsome new Sith enforcer as remorseless as he is mysterious; and Tarkin—whose tactical cunning and cold-blooded efficiency will pave the way for the Empire’s supremacy ... and its enemies’ extinction.

Book Review:

I’ve long been a reader of the Star Wars Expanded Universe. In fact, most of my favorite characters and storylines come from the books, not the movies. But Tarkin is one that caught my interest in the movie, and I’ve been waiting a long time for his story.

But TARKIN just wasn’t the book I hoped it would be.

First I should say that James Luceno’s writing style doesn’t always work for me, and this is one of those books where it really didn’t work. I slogged through this book, constantly distracted by descriptions of every single person encountered, down to their hair color, facial features, and attire. Once you take away all the descriptions and random tangents, there’s not a lot of story left. And the story that is there … well, I can’t imagine Tarkin being outfoxed in the way he was, and by a group that didn’t have a strong motive. I’m also not sure I buy his “training” on Eriadu.

TARKIN contains passages from characters other than Tarkin, including Emperor Palpatine and the ship thieves, but … everyone sounds the same when they open their mouths. I just can’t see Darth Vader speaking like this: “Then there was some purpose to turning a blind eye to illegality, and to fostering dishonesty of a particular sort. But times have changed, and it is incumbent on you to change with them (Chapter 7).”

I was hoping for a book about Tarkin, but though TARKIN contains some flashbacks to his youth, the book is mostly about him and Darth Vader taking a trip around the galaxy to find Tarkin’s ship. There are a few examples of Tarkin’s ruthlessness, which I did like, but otherwise … I didn’t believe in Luceno’s version of him. It just didn’t work for me. Hunting animals and living primally doesn’t turn one into a military strategist — why not show more of Tarkin’s time at the academy? Why not show some important events, instead of telling me about them? That’s another big gripe I have with the author’s writing: he tells almost everything, instead of showing me what’s going on. And I’m not going into the tons of classes of ships I’d never heard of before, and dialogue like the line I quoted from Darth Vader.

Ultimately, TARKIN was a disappointing story about such an iconic character. When I finished the book, I thought, “That’s it? Really?” The main plot was, well, weak, and there were unresolved side plots, including the Emperor feeling dark currents in the Force? The ending of the book felt rushed. Instead of spending so much time detailing everything, maybe more attention should have been giving to developing sub plots and connecting everything together.

I think from now on I’ll stay away from Star Wars books written by Luceno, and possibly the new reboot of the EU, since I haven’t liked what’s come out of it so far.

– leeanna

Book Review: I Become Shadow by Joe Shine

Book Review: I Become Shadow by Joe ShineI Become Shadow by Joe Shine
Published by Soho Teen on June 10, 2014
Genres: Romance, Science Fiction, Young Adult
Pages: 304
Format: ARC
Source: Amazon Vine
Goodreads
3 Stars
Ren Sharpe was abducted at fourteen and chosen by the mysterious F.A.T.E. Center to become a Shadow: the fearless and unstoppable guardian of a future leader. Everything she held dear—her family, her home, her former life—is gone forever.

Ren survives four years of training, torture, and misery, in large part thanks to Junie, a fellow F.A.T.E. abductee who started out as lost and confused as she did. She wouldn’t admit it was possible to find love in a prison beyond imagining, but what she feels for Junie may just be the closest thing to it.

At eighteen they part ways when Ren receives her assignment: find and protect college science student Gareth Young, or die trying. Life following a college nerd is uneventful, until an attack on Gareth forces Ren to track down the only person she can trust. When she and Junie discover that the F.A.T.E. itself might be behind the attacks, even certain knowledge of the future may not be enough to save their kidnappers from the killing machines they created.

Book Review:

You know how most fourteen-year-olds stress about high school? Ren doesn’t have to worry about that for long, because she’s abducted by F.A.T.E., a secret organization that protects the world’s future important people. Instead of worrying about boys, popularity, grades, etc., Ren’s worried about making it through training alive. Most kids taken by F.A.T.E. don’t make it, which is no shock, considering the classes include weapons training with live rounds, beating the stuffing out of each other, and a nightly injection that kills all the nerves in your body.

I BECOME SHADOW starts off slowly and with some backpedaling, because Ren fills the reader in on her normal life before being taken. If you’re confused at the start, keep going and things will eventually make sense. Ren has a unique voice, one I think readers will either like or dislike. She’s sarcastic, mouthy, no-nonsense, and cocky, but sometimes she’s also “woe is me.” Most of the time I liked her narration, but once in a while it did feel like the author was trying too hard.

After Ren starts training and then once she gets her assignment, the book is full of action. I thought the author did a good job writing the action scenes; sometimes I skim them because they’re boring or hard to picture. That wasn’t the case here.

I BECOME SHADOW was almost a really good book for me. There are some great ideas, including F.A.T.E. and its mission. When Ren graduates training, she’s linked to the person she’ll spend the rest of her life protecting. The process makes it almost painful for her to be away from him, and if he’s in danger? Forget about it. She’s supposed to stay in the shadows, but I don’t think I’m spoiling anything by saying she breaks the rules.

Then we get into the parts of the book that didn’t work out so well for me. Ren starts to have feelings for Gareth, the kid she protects, but are they real or a byproduct of the link? At the same time, she’s pining for Junie, a guy she went through training with. I believed in Ren and Junie’s friendship, but not their romantic feelings for each other. I really wish the author would have kept it as a friendship rather than try to add romance. Because apparently all YA books need romance. Not.

The end of I BECOME SHADOW also felt rushed. A lot of the book is spent on training time, and then some with Ren on the job protecting Gareth. Then the big climax, and boom, the book’s over. When I finished I BECOME SHADOW, I had quite a few questions about F.A.T.E. and Shadows and other things. I’m guessing there will be a sequel or two to flesh things out? I don’t know for sure.

Overall, I BECOME SHADOW is strong in the action and sarcastic heroine departments, but lacking in the romance and storytelling.

Socialize with the author:

Joe Shine:
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– leeanna

Book Review: Memory of Water by Emmi Itäranta

Book Review: Memory of Water by Emmi ItärantaMemory of Water by Emmi Itäranta
Published by Harper Voyager on June 10, 2014
Genres: Post-Apocalyptic, Science Fantasy, Science Fiction, Speculative Fiction
Pages: 272
Format: ARC
Source: Amazon Vine
Goodreads
4 Stars
Global warming has changed the world's geography and its politics. Wars are waged over water, and China rules Europe, including the Scandinavian Union, which is occupied by the power state of New Qian. In this far north place, seventeen-year-old Noria Kaitio is learning to become a tea master like her father, a position that holds great responsibility and great secrets. Tea masters alone know the location of hidden water sources, including the natural spring that Noria's father tends, which once provided water for her whole village.

But secrets do not stay hidden forever, and after her father's death the army starts watching their town-and Noria. And as water becomes even scarcer, Noria must choose between safety and striking out, between knowledge and kinship.

Imaginative and engaging, lyrical and poignant, Memory of Water is an indelible novel that portrays a future that is all too possible.

Book Review:

“But I knew that was what the best stories were like: you could believe in them, even if you knew they were just imagination (p. 65).”

For me, the above quote perfectly sums up MEMORY OF WATER. This book feels like it could come true. Sometime in the future, we could live in a world where there’s very little fresh water. In a world where the army controls all sources of water, there’s water rationing, and water crimes result in death.

The progress of MEMORY OF WATER is a lot like water. The book moves along slowly but surely, sometimes circling obstacles, but always coming back to the main story. I will warn you that this book doesn’t have a neat ending or resolution, which is usually something that bugs the heck out of me, because I like concrete endings, but it didn’t bother me here.

I did have some trouble getting into the book when I started it. But once I read a few chapters and got used to Noria’s narration, the author’s writing style, and the world, I didn’t want to put the book down. I finished it in one day, and a week later, I’m still thinking about MEMORY OF WATER.

Noria is a tea master, perhaps an odd profession in a world where water is so scarce. But tea masters preserve traditions, and Noria’s family also guards a secret spring, one of the last free springs. The secret spring lets the author explore lots of questions: Can water be controlled by the army? Should free water be kept a secret when families are suffering, even dying because they don’t have enough water? Should one take the easy way out, or stand up for what one believes in?

There’s not a lot of action in MEMORY OF WATER, which is a-okay. The book doesn’t need it. I’m just pointing that out because this book is different (in a good way) from a lot of the popular dystopian/post-apocalyptic YA fiction out there. MEMORY OF WATER is a book to make you think, a book that laps at the edges of your brain as you read. And the writing is just gorgeous, descriptive and evocative without falling into the usual cliches.

There is one thing about MEMORY OF WATER I didn’t like, which made it a 4 star book instead of a 5 star book. In order to explain what that one thing is, I have to do some plot spoiling, so don’t keep reading if you don’t want to know what happens. I will say it relates to worldbuilding, and while the author paints an excellent portrait of the world now, daily life and politics included, she doesn’t go into too much detail of how it became that way.

Otherwise, an amazing debut. Simple in some ways, but so complex in others. A real thought provoking book, putting the speculative in speculative fiction. I will definitely be on the lookout for more from Emmi Itäranta.

 

 

 

Last spoiler warning!

 

 

 

Okay. One of my big peeves is when authors withhold information from the reader. Noria and her best friend discover the truth about how the world changed, but the author does not tell the reader. That information stays a secret between Noria and Sanja, which is a shame, because I really wanted to know what happened. If they hadn’t found out the truth, I wouldn’t have been as disappointed, but they did, and so I was irked over that.

Socialize with the author:

Emmi Itäranta:
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– leeanna

Book Review: Avalon (Avalon #1) by Mindee Arnett

Book Review: Avalon (Avalon #1) by Mindee ArnettAvalon by Mindee Arnett
Series: Avalon #1
Published by Balzer & Bray on January 21, 2014
Genres: Romance, Science Fiction, Young Adult
Pages: 418
Format: ARC
Source: Amazon Vine, Edelweiss
Goodreads
2 Stars
A ragtag group of teenage mercenaries who crew the spaceship Avalon stumble upon a conspiracy that could threaten the entire galaxy in this fascinating and fast-paced sci-fi adventure from author Mindee Arnett.

Of the various star systems that make up the Confederation, most lie thousands of light-years from First Earth-and out here, no one is free. The agencies that govern the Confederation are as corrupt as the crime bosses who patrol it, and power is held by anyone with enough greed and ruthlessness to claim it. That power is derived from one thing: metatech, the devices that allow people to travel great distances faster than the speed of light.

Jeth Seagrave and his crew of teenage mercenaries have survived in this world by stealing unsecured metatech, and they're damn good at it. Jeth doesn't care about the politics or the law; all he cares about is earning enough money to buy back his parents' ship, Avalon, from his crime-boss employer and getting himself and his sister, Lizzie, the heck out of Dodge. But when Jeth finds himself in possession of information that both the crime bosses and the government are willing to kill for, he is going to have to ask himself how far he'll go to get the freedom he's wanted for so long.

Avalon is the perfect fit for teens new to sci-fi as well as seasoned sci-fi readers looking for more books in the YA space-and a great match for fans of Joss Whedon's cult hit show Firefly.

Book Review:

Over the years, various friends have tried to get me to watch Joss Whedon’s Firefly. However, I’d rather read books than watch TV series. So when I saw AVALON described for fans of Firefly, I thought this would be the book for me.

Unfortunately, I wish I’d skipped reading AVALON and watched Firefly instead.

Jeth leads a crew of teenage starship thieves. Working for one of the biggest crime lords in the galaxy, they steal metatech. Metatech allows other criminals or people who don’t want the attention of the Interstellar Transport Authority to travel across great distances in the blink of an eye. But when they steal a ship with a busted metadrive, Jeth and his crew find themselves in the middle of a very, very big problem.

AVALON just didn’t capture my attention. The beginning and middle were slow. Any time I put the book down, I didn’t feel compelled to pick it back up and find out how it ended. I did persevere, though, and thought the ending had way too much going on compared to the rest of the book. Jeth didn’t interest me, either. He works for the crime lord because his uncle gambled away his parents’ ship, Avalon, and he wants to buy her back. Of course, it’s not so easy as that, but I didn’t feel for Jeth and his predicament.

Ultimately, AVALON just wasn’t exciting for me. It was okay, but not the great YA sci-fi book I thought it would be. This is one series I won’t be continuing.

Socialize with the author:

Mindee Arnett:
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– leeanna